REST/RPC example update by Mirobit · Pull Request #10710

Technical: The Path to Taproot Activation

Taproot! Everybody wants to have it, somebody wants to make it, nobody knows how to get it!
(If you are asking why everybody wants it, see: Technical: Taproot: Why Activate?)
(Pedants: I mostly elide over lockin times)
Briefly, Taproot is that neat new thing that gets us:
So yes, let's activate taproot!

The SegWit Wars

The biggest problem with activating Taproot is PTSD from the previous softfork, SegWit. Pieter Wuille, one of the authors of the current Taproot proposal, has consistently held the position that he will not discuss activation, and will accept whatever activation process is imposed on Taproot. Other developers have expressed similar opinions.
So what happened with SegWit activation that was so traumatic? SegWit used the BIP9 activation method. Let's dive into BIP9!

BIP9 Miner-Activated Soft Fork

Basically, BIP9 has a bunch of parameters:
Now there are other parameters (name, starttime) but they are not anywhere near as important as the above two.
A number that is not a parameter, is 95%. Basically, activation of a BIP9 softfork is considered as actually succeeding if at least 95% of blocks in the last 2 weeks had the specified bit in the nVersion set. If less than 95% had this bit set before the timeout, then the upgrade fails and never goes into the network. This is not a parameter: it is a constant defined by BIP9, and developers using BIP9 activation cannot change this.
So, first some simple questions and their answers:

The Great Battles of the SegWit Wars

SegWit not only fixed transaction malleability, it also created a practical softforkable blocksize increase that also rebalanced weights so that the cost of spending a UTXO is about the same as the cost of creating UTXOs (and spending UTXOs is "better" since it limits the size of the UTXO set that every fullnode has to maintain).
So SegWit was written, the activation was decided to be BIP9, and then.... miner signalling stalled at below 75%.
Thus were the Great SegWit Wars started.

BIP9 Feature Hostage

If you are a miner with at least 5% global hashpower, you can hold a BIP9-activated softfork hostage.
You might even secretly want the softfork to actually push through. But you might want to extract concession from the users and the developers. Like removing the halvening. Or raising or even removing the block size caps (which helps larger miners more than smaller miners, making it easier to become a bigger fish that eats all the smaller fishes). Or whatever.
With BIP9, you can hold the softfork hostage. You just hold out and refuse to signal. You tell everyone you will signal, if and only if certain concessions are given to you.
This ability by miners to hold a feature hostage was enabled because of the miner-exit allowed by the timeout on BIP9. Prior to that, miners were considered little more than expendable security guards, paid for the risk they take to secure the network, but not special in the grand scheme of Bitcoin.

Covert ASICBoost

ASICBoost was a novel way of optimizing SHA256 mining, by taking advantage of the structure of the 80-byte header that is hashed in order to perform proof-of-work. The details of ASICBoost are out-of-scope here but you can read about it elsewhere
Here is a short summary of the two types of ASICBoost, relevant to the activation discussion.
Now, "overt" means "obvious", while "covert" means hidden. Overt ASICBoost is obvious because nVersion bits that are not currently in use for BIP9 activations are usually 0 by default, so setting those bits to 1 makes it obvious that you are doing something weird (namely, Overt ASICBoost). Covert ASICBoost is non-obvious because the order of transactions in a block are up to the miner anyway, so the miner rearranging the transactions in order to get lower power consumption is not going to be detected.
Unfortunately, while Overt ASICBoost was compatible with SegWit, Covert ASICBoost was not. This is because, pre-SegWit, only the block header Merkle tree committed to the transaction ordering. However, with SegWit, another Merkle tree exists, which commits to transaction ordering as well. Covert ASICBoost would require more computation to manipulate two Merkle trees, obviating the power benefits of Covert ASICBoost anyway.
Now, miners want to use ASICBoost (indeed, about 60->70% of current miners probably use the Overt ASICBoost nowadays; if you have a Bitcoin fullnode running you will see the logs with lots of "60 of last 100 blocks had unexpected versions" which is exactly what you would see with the nVersion manipulation that Overt ASICBoost does). But remember: ASICBoost was, at around the time, a novel improvement. Not all miners had ASICBoost hardware. Those who did, did not want it known that they had ASICBoost hardware, and wanted to do Covert ASICBoost!
But Covert ASICBoost is incompatible with SegWit, because SegWit actually has two Merkle trees of transaction data, and Covert ASICBoost works by fudging around with transaction ordering in a block, and recomputing two Merkle Trees is more expensive than recomputing just one (and loses the ASICBoost advantage).
Of course, those miners that wanted Covert ASICBoost did not want to openly admit that they had ASICBoost hardware, they wanted to keep their advantage secret because miners are strongly competitive in a very tight market. And doing ASICBoost Covertly was just the ticket, but they could not work post-SegWit.
Fortunately, due to the BIP9 activation process, they could hold SegWit hostage while covertly taking advantage of Covert ASICBoost!

UASF: BIP148 and BIP8

When the incompatibility between Covert ASICBoost and SegWit was realized, still, activation of SegWit stalled, and miners were still not openly claiming that ASICBoost was related to non-activation of SegWit.
Eventually, a new proposal was created: BIP148. With this rule, 3 months before the end of the SegWit timeout, nodes would reject blocks that did not signal SegWit. Thus, 3 months before SegWit timeout, BIP148 would force activation of SegWit.
This proposal was not accepted by Bitcoin Core, due to the shortening of the timeout (it effectively times out 3 months before the initial SegWit timeout). Instead, a fork of Bitcoin Core was created which added the patch to comply with BIP148. This was claimed as a User Activated Soft Fork, UASF, since users could freely download the alternate fork rather than sticking with the developers of Bitcoin Core.
Now, BIP148 effectively is just a BIP9 activation, except at its (earlier) timeout, the new rules would be activated anyway (instead of the BIP9-mandated behavior that the upgrade is cancelled at the end of the timeout).
BIP148 was actually inspired by the BIP8 proposal (the link here is a historical version; BIP8 has been updated recently, precisely in preparation for Taproot activation). BIP8 is basically BIP9, but at the end of timeout, the softfork is activated anyway rather than cancelled.
This removed the ability of miners to hold the softfork hostage. At best, they can delay the activation, but not stop it entirely by holding out as in BIP9.
Of course, this implies risk that not all miners have upgraded before activation, leading to possible losses for SPV users, as well as again re-pressuring miners to signal activation, possibly without the miners actually upgrading their software to properly impose the new softfork rules.

BIP91, SegWit2X, and The Aftermath

BIP148 inspired countermeasures, possibly from the Covert ASiCBoost miners, possibly from concerned users who wanted to offer concessions to miners. To this day, the common name for BIP148 - UASF - remains an emotionally-charged rallying cry for parts of the Bitcoin community.
One of these was SegWit2X. This was brokered in a deal between some Bitcoin personalities at a conference in New York, and thus part of the so-called "New York Agreement" or NYA, another emotionally-charged acronym.
The text of the NYA was basically:
  1. Set up a new activation threshold at 80% signalled at bit 4 (vs bit 1 for SegWit).
    • When this 80% signalling was reached, miners would require that bit 1 for SegWit be signalled to achive the 95% activation needed for SegWit.
  2. If the bit 4 signalling reached 80%, increase the block weight limit from the SegWit 4000000 to the SegWit2X 8000000, 6 months after bit 1 activation.
The first item above was coded in BIP91.
Unfortunately, if you read the BIP91, independently of NYA, you might come to the conclusion that BIP91 was only about lowering the threshold to 80%. In particular, BIP91 never mentions anything about the second point above, it never mentions that bit 4 80% threshold would also signal for a later hardfork increase in weight limit.
Because of this, even though there are claims that NYA (SegWit2X) reached 80% dominance, a close reading of BIP91 shows that the 80% dominance was only for SegWit activation, without necessarily a later 2x capacity hardfork (SegWit2X).
This ambiguity of bit 4 (NYA says it includes a 2x capacity hardfork, BIP91 says it does not) has continued to be a thorn in blocksize debates later. Economically speaking, Bitcoin futures between SegWit and SegWit2X showed strong economic dominance in favor of SegWit (SegWit2X futures were traded at a fraction in value of SegWit futures: I personally made a tidy but small amount of money betting against SegWit2X in the futures market), so suggesting that NYA achieved 80% dominance even in mining is laughable, but the NYA text that ties bit 4 to SegWit2X still exists.
Historically, BIP91 triggered which caused SegWit to activate before the BIP148 shorter timeout. BIP148 proponents continue to hold this day that it was the BIP148 shorter timeout and no-compromises-activate-on-August-1 that made miners flock to BIP91 as a face-saving tactic that actually removed the second clause of NYA. NYA supporters keep pointing to the bit 4 text in the NYA and the historical activation of BIP91 as a failed promise by Bitcoin developers.

Taproot Activation Proposals

There are two primary proposals I can see for Taproot activation:
  1. BIP8.
  2. Modern Softfork Activation.
We have discussed BIP8: roughly, it has bit and timeout, if 95% of miners signal bit it activates, at the end of timeout it activates. (EDIT: BIP8 has had recent updates: at the end of timeout it can now activate or fail. For the most part, in the below text "BIP8", means BIP8-and-activate-at-timeout, and "BIP9" means BIP8-and-fail-at-timeout)
So let's take a look at Modern Softfork Activation!

Modern Softfork Activation

This is a more complex activation method, composed of BIP9 and BIP8 as supcomponents.
  1. First have a 12-month BIP9 (fail at timeout).
  2. If the above fails to activate, have a 6-month discussion period during which users and developers and miners discuss whether to continue to step 3.
  3. Have a 24-month BIP8 (activate at timeout).
The total above is 42 months, if you are counting: 3.5 years worst-case activation.
The logic here is that if there are no problems, BIP9 will work just fine anyway. And if there are problems, the 6-month period should weed it out. Finally, miners cannot hold the feature hostage since the 24-month BIP8 period will exist anyway.

PSA: Being Resilient to Upgrades

Software is very birttle.
Anyone who has been using software for a long time has experienced something like this:
  1. You hear a new version of your favorite software has a nice new feature.
  2. Excited, you install the new version.
  3. You find that the new version has subtle incompatibilities with your current workflow.
  4. You are sad and downgrade to the older version.
  5. You find out that the new version has changed your files in incompatible ways that the old version cannot work with anymore.
  6. You tearfully reinstall the newer version and figure out how to get your lost productivity now that you have to adapt to a new workflow
If you are a technically-competent user, you might codify your workflow into a bunch of programs. And then you upgrade one of the external pieces of software you are using, and find that it has a subtle incompatibility with your current workflow which is based on a bunch of simple programs you wrote yourself. And if those simple programs are used as the basis of some important production system, you hve just screwed up because you upgraded software on an important production system.
And well, one of the issues with new softfork activation is that if not enough people (users and miners) upgrade to the newest Bitcoin software, the security of the new softfork rules are at risk.
Upgrading software of any kind is always a risk, and the more software you build on top of the software-being-upgraded, the greater you risk your tower of software collapsing while you change its foundations.
So if you have some complex Bitcoin-manipulating system with Bitcoin somewhere at the foundations, consider running two Bitcoin nodes:
  1. One is a "stable-version" Bitcoin node. Once it has synced, set it up to connect=x.x.x.x to the second node below (so that your ISP bandwidth is only spent on the second node). Use this node to run all your software: it's a stable version that you don't change for long periods of time. Enable txiindex, disable pruning, whatever your software needs.
  2. The other is an "always-up-to-date" Bitcoin Node. Keep its stoarge down with pruning (initially sync it off the "stable-version" node). You can't use blocksonly if your "stable-version" node needs to send transactions, but otherwise this "always-up-to-date" Bitcoin node can be kept as a low-resource node, so you can run both nodes in the same machine.
When a new Bitcoin version comes up, you just upgrade the "always-up-to-date" Bitcoin node. This protects you if a future softfork activates, you will only receive valid Bitcoin blocks and transactions. Since this node has nothing running on top of it, it is just a special peer of the "stable-version" node, any software incompatibilities with your system software do not exist.
Your "stable-version" Bitcoin node remains the same version until you are ready to actually upgrade this node and are prepared to rewrite most of the software you have running on top of it due to version compatibility problems.
When upgrading the "always-up-to-date", you can bring it down safely and then start it later. Your "stable-version" wil keep running, disconnected from the network, but otherwise still available for whatever queries. You do need some system to stop the "always-up-to-date" node if for any reason the "stable-version" goes down (otherwisee if the "always-up-to-date" advances its pruning window past what your "stable-version" has, the "stable-version" cannot sync afterwards), but if you are technically competent enough that you need to do this, you are technically competent enough to write such a trivial monitor program (EDIT: gmax notes you can adjust the pruning window by RPC commands to help with this as well).
This recommendation is from gmaxwell on IRC, by the way.
submitted by almkglor to Bitcoin [link] [comments]

How to verify if a transaction is correctly signed?

Given an arbitrary signed raw transaction, how can we easily verify if all inputs are correctly signed (admiting all UTXOs are present and fee is higher than zero)? I know there is an RPC command in bitcoin core testmempoolaccept but this will also check if all inputs are available to be spent in the mempool/blockchain and I want to test a transaction that is a child to a parent transaction that has not yet been broadcasted.
The signed transaction instance could have the scriptPubKey of the used utxos stored as metadata (since it needs to know these to sign each input) and use the stored utxos to perform this validation - alternatively, the verification method could ask for the scriptPubKeys of the utxos as input. I was looking for some nice way to do this in python but was surprised how neglected this task is:
EDIT: converting to PSBT is not possible/easy so the last option I mentioned won't work. I have the transactions in serialized 'network' format (what you get from `bitcoin-cli getrawtransaction hex')
EDIT2: escalated to bitcoin stack exchange: https://bitcoin.stackexchange.com/questions/96759/how-to-verify-if-a-transaction-is-correctly-signed
submitted by johnturtle to BitcoinBeginners [link] [comments]

Deep fundamental reasons behind all conflicts with Tezos Foundation

Let's first take a look at two core ideas behind Tezos protocol:
  1. In Bitcoin protocol, there are those who create blocks (miners) and users. Those are two fundamentally different groups. As a result of that they do have fundamentally different interests. When those interests are aligned, it's all work very well. However, sometimes those interests might get misaligned. Miners might want one set of changes in the protocol while users might want another set of changes. Tezos procotol solves this problem via proof of stake's baking mechanism by allowing users of XTZ to become block creators (like miners in Bitcoin protocol). Users/holders of XTZ and block creators are now fundamentally the same group and therefore there is no interest misalignment. Moreover, as a consequence of choosing proof of stake over proof of work, almost anyone can become a baker at low cost. Of course, there is a minimum requirement but it can be easily reduced through voting if price XTZ goes too high;
  2. Although per (1) problem of misalignment between users and miners solved, Tezos protocol make one step further. Namely, there is self-amending mechanisms in protocol. Through of the set of voting rounds, attached bounties (via dillution), there is a deterministic path to resolve disputes in upgrading Tezos protocol. Nobody knows the future, nobody knows how protocol should look like after 5-10-20 years. That's why it's very important to have self-amending procedure. Without deterministic path to protocol upgrade, you will have fork-wars like in Bitcoin. As a result of these fork-wars, you now have Bitcoin, Bitcoin Cash, Bitcoin SV. Also, with built-in bounties via dillution, Tezos protocol guarantees funding for its further development;
There is third core idea behind Tezos protocol. Namely, formal verification friendly, low-level and explicit smart contract language - Michelson. While it's very important feature, it's not relevant for this discussion.
Now imagine you are going back in time when Tezos protocol isn't implemented yet, only draft whitepaper. How would you bring it to life if you were original author?
If there were no crypto-currencies, then all you have to do is to take time and implement minimum viable product (MVP) on your own. May be you might do it with co-founder but it's not really necessary for releasing the first version of protocol in absence of any competition.
However, the field was already crowded and time works against you. It would be necessary for project's survival to be as fast as possible in such dynamic field. You need to raise funds to hire dozen of strong programmers to implement Tezos protocol and on top of that to fund development of ecosystem in Tezos network. Namely, wallets, higher-level languages on top of low-level Michelson, education materials for future smart contract writers, new projects similar to 0x, Maker, Compound, Cryptokitties etc.
Now, I would like you to make a pause and think what is Tezos protocol. It tries to align incentives of parties using game-theoretic constructs! And now, I would like you to make second pause and think what crypto-currencies are all about in broader sense. Crypto-currencies are about eliminating centralization and unnecessary middle-mans. One of the biggest middle-mans is governments and their legal system.
People who are in the space for long time should know how much crypto-currencies influenced by Austrian School of Economics (read Hayek's book "Denationalization Of Money" (1976) and early Satoshi Nakamoto's posts).
With that in mind (spirit behind Tezos and crypto-currencies in general), how would you fund development of Tezos protocol and later its initial ecosystem?
The correct answer is to setup decentralized autonomus organization (DAO). Initial DAO on Ethereum protocol since you don't have any Tezos protocol implementations (remember, we are still back in time!).
This DAO will be used to develop Tezos protocol itself and leverage power of smart contracts to correctly align incentives for development of Tezos protocol. Namely, backers of this DAO would get ERC20 token representing voting and governance power. For example, let's say founders raised 250M USD worth in ETH and all of these money will be locked in smart contract. Only backers can unlock funds from smart contract by tranches as Tezos protocol developers making progress. It would be similar to traditional world - seed round, round A, round B etc. When Tezos mainnet goes live, backers would receive proportional amount of XTZ as their ERC20 voting tokens on Ethereum. Since that initial DAO would still have tons of ETH locked by the time Tezos mainnet released, those proceeds will be used to fund wallet developers, high-language developers, and so on (via voting by backers of course).
In this scenario, I would envision that the first big project after Tezos mainnet launched would be to build trustless, decentralized bridge between Tezos blockchain and Ethereum blockchain. Simply, because it would be good to migrate intial DAO and its ETH funds into Tezos blockchain.
There are only two downsides with this approach:
  1. You can't raise funds in Bitcoin but who cares if it's 100M or even 50M (still huge amount of money);
  2. Many people in crypto-space will make fun of you because you just setup DAO on Ethereum while developing Ethereum competitor;
Neither of these two downsides is important. Ultimate upside is that backers has direct control over how funds are spent because they would be the only ones who can unlock funds by voting for proposals.
On meta-level, you would have beautiful symmetry. Namely, you develop Tezos protocol and its ecosystem, using the similar ideas and spirit as Tezos protocol itself!
But we all know that it was never happened!
We all know drama with Gevers who tried to capture power at Tezos Foundation. We all know that there is no RPC command in Tezos github to vote out Tezos Foundation members ;) We all know that we are not in control of Tezos Foundation. Tezos Foundation is a swiss non-profit organization with its own board and we are not part of it. Tezos Foundation is govern under Swiss law and most of you are not even Swiss citizens.
Here is the question why Breitmans suddently decided to throw away all fundamental principles behind crypto-currencies and just went all-in with traditional world? Why we all got stuck with our own mini-Washington, namely Tezos Foundation? There is one reason why Breitmans decided to throw away all their principles and stick with this strange scheme involving Swiss foundations.
The reason is ... socialism. You might think I'm joking but stay with me. There were roaring 1920s and following 1929 stock market crash (by the way that was actually caused by government creating credit bubble). Republican (but still a socialist) Herbert Hoover created depression from 1929 crash. Franklin Roosevelt made this depression truly great! He imposed price-controls and outright gold confiscation (check "Executive Order 6102"). One of his most terrible pieces of paternalistic socialist legislation was "Securities Act of 1933". And this is the reason why Breitmans tried so hard escape iron hand of Roosevelt's zombie.
The same month as Tezos fundraiser, SEC issued statement about the most famous Ethereum DAO:
https://www.sec.gov/news/press-release/2017-131
https://www.sec.gov/litigation/investreport/34-81207.pdf
Basically, they tried to say that DAO violated their 1933 Securities Act (aka Roosevelt zombie). I'm not claiming that Breitmans anticipated this exact SEC statement about Ethereum DAO. All I'm saying that they are smart enough to understand that SEC might come after them as well. It doesn't matter if SEC had right to do so. It doesn't matter that XTZ is not security at all. Only people outside of hardcore old school crypto-community would believe in such non-sense as rights. The truth is that any government is essentially an army which controls a territory and they (not you!) decide what they think is right or wrong.
Breitmans knew that SEC might chase them with bloody machete, so they decided to play traditional game which many played when Switzerland still had numbered accounts. Namely, using Switzerland as old-style traditional escape from Roosevelt zombies.
Unfortunately, for them they got in hands of people who knew too well how actually Swiss foundations work. We all remember how Gevers tried to exploit Swiss law about foundations to seize control over foundation's assets. Now we have new drama. But fundamentally, it's all because Breitmans choose Swiss law over Ethereum smart-contracts.
Don't get me wrong, I'm not blaming Breitmans. I really think that their fear of Roosevelt zombie with bloody machete led them to setup weird foundation in Switzerland. In normal circumstances, I don't see any rational reason not to setup DAO as I described above.
Zooming out, on the bigger scale, you might see that these two worlds (i.e. traditional government law and crypto) are not compatible at all. You just can't have both of two worlds.
For the same reason, I don't believe in STOs. It's a nice toy, a temporary thing to bootstrap your Defi ecosystem in Tezos but nothing more than that.
Every STO, at some point, rely on some centralized entity which is controlled by law of some jurisdiction. Once government (aka army which control territories and make visibility of its own legitimacy via elections and passing laws) decides that your STO is not compliant, all these STO tokens will be worthless overnight. More on this in my another long post:
https://www.reddit.com/MakerDAO/comments/de0sys/kyc_is_absolutely_not_acceptable_for_makerdao/
Regardless of what's happen with Tezos Foundation, I strongly believe that Tezos protocol will thrive. Mainnet went life and the jinn that can't be put back in the bottle!
Update: Many here criticized my position regarding STOs. That's partly my fault with being too lax with terminology (once I wrote big post, I didn't have much energy to clarify on STOs in the end). By STO, I mean any tokens backed by regulated assets (again, I know it's lax definition). I assumed almost everyone here is for open, borderless finance. As a result of that, I assumed that you want to make these tokens available for everyone and that's why one day government will put pressure on such STO issuers to freeze tokens. However, it's turned out that some people excited for STOs being fully regulated from the start and therefore these tokens wouldn't be available for everyone. Basically, some people see main benefits of STOs as being pro-actively censorship friendly. In other words, they want to move all compliance on blockchain. Whereas, I see very existence of government regulations as root of all problems. Having said that, I'm not against STOs but I'm not very excited about them either. You have to make great mental leap to understand that fully-regulated STOs fundamentally solving wrong problem. You have to build fully censorship resistant technology, not fully censorship friendly. No matter how big market for STOs, it's still several orders of magnitude smaller than potential world of fully-inclusive finance without any borders whatsoever. Tezos is very well equipped for this ambitious task especially with new privacy features coming. Remember, Satoshi Nakamoto didn't ask permission from governments before releasing Bitcoin.
submitted by omgcoin to tezos [link] [comments]

Need a mentor for Mastering Bitcoin

I started reading through Mastering Bitcoin and I am a bit stuck on the last part of chapter 03:
https://github.com/bitcoinbook/bitcoinbook/blob/develop/ch03.asciidoc#rpc_example
I mean how do we run link:code/rpc_example.py[]
I tried to run it on on terminal, but it didn't work. Also, I couldn't find rpc_example.py inside of repo.
Is there any place where I can find a mentor? some chat or community where I can ask questions?
submitted by craswerr to BitcoinBeginners [link] [comments]

Adding Monero support to a P2P game, need some advice

Hello everyone,
I'm currently in the process of adding Monero support to a peer-to-peer game I've been working on and would like to ask this community for some advice.
The application has a few hard requirements that must be met:
  1. The Monero integration must be done using JavaScript (primarily for Node but browser's okay too).
  2. The application must be able to create addresses and accompanying private keys internally (no CLI or external API). Preferably, these should be derived addresses using a master or main one (like HD wallets in Bitcoin).
  3. The application must be able to generate raw transactions internally -- no CLI or or external API. For this part let's assume that the input UTXOs are going to be available somehow (from a database, for example).
  4. The application must be able to sign raw transactions internally -- no CLI or or external API.
When I say "no CLI", I mean no RPC wallet or daemon; no external API calls either.
Essentially, I should be able to do the above offline, using JavaScript only, and then just post the signed transactions later (this part can be done via CLI or API). These are core requirements for the project otherwise I'd just use RPC or a service and save myself a lot of work.
So my question is: is there a documented JavaScript library that supports all of the above functionality?
I found a project called mymonero-core-js which appears to do what I'd need, but there doesn't seem to be any accompanying documentation (the included unit tests don't offer much information). Does this documentation exist?
There's also an offline wallet generator but it's also undocumented and kinda unwieldy (one huge file).
The game (my project), already supports Bitcoin and Bitcoin Cash using these constraints, and I've done fairly extensive work with Ethereum, smart contracts, and crypto in general (not just cryptocurrencies, I mean), so I shouldn't need much hand-holding.
Thanks muchly in advance!
P.S. It's not my intention to advertise my project so I haven't posted a link but I'll be happy to share if anyone asks.
submitted by monican_agent to Monero [link] [comments]

Wasabi Wallet v1.1.11

https://github.com/zkSNACKs/WalletWasabi/releases
Summary
This major release is the culmination of several efforts that have been a work in progress for a long time.
submitted by yahiheb to Bitcoin [link] [comments]

Wasabi Wallet v1.1.11

https://github.com/zkSNACKs/WalletWasabi/releases

Summary

This major release is the culmination of several efforts that have been a work in progress for a long time.
submitted by yahiheb to WasabiWallet [link] [comments]

A giant Faucet for HTML5 Canvas JavaScript


An example of a pseudo 3d effect using rectangle particles as water droplets
This is a giant Faucet for HTML5 Canvas JavaScript. With a mouse click the faucet will turn on and water particles will start pouring out until it is closed again. When it hits some vertical offset, the water will dissipate outwards with each particle getting slightly bigger as a front perspective view for a pseudo-3d effect. Particle clean-up/removal occurs when reaching the bottom canvas border to keep things running smoothly. Little mists near the spout hole are generated with random vx and vy velocity, with text indication on each side as on/off along with sound effects. The faucet image was modified using Adobe Photoshop.
A use case scenario would be a literal tongue-in-cheek faucet for said crypto-currency. The way you would dispense a set number of coins would require running a server with a full active node in Linux. Then by using a backend script such as a modified variation of bitcoinPHP, python, or nodeJS can be used to validate a user's wallet address by which a set amount can be safely sent with integrated SSL (secure socket layer) protocols via Remote Procedure Calls or RPCs. It's another fun way of 'spicing' up these kinds of projects, if that's your thing.
submitted by Chancellor-Parks to html5 [link] [comments]

Creamcoin 0.18.0.0 – following Bitcoin’s tale

Creamcoin 0.18.0.0 – following Bitcoin’s tale

06/08/2019 3 min read📷216SHARES216VIEWSShare on Twitter
When new Creamcoin was designed, we had in mind not only a coin that would hold parity with any cryptocurrency, but something that would demonstrate the extra-special capabilities of a decentralized ledger, capable to introduce, help and bring it further to the regular people. Blockchain developing is unstoppable complex process with endless possibilities. Integration of applications on such a technology could achieve better, secure pass of value.
0.18.0.0

On August 5th, 2019 Creamcoin code was successfully updated to the latest Bitcoin version 0.18.0
https://github.com/creamcoin/cream/
With this latest release, we proved that Creamcoin itself it’s not a sort of a tenant to the Bitcoin. Much easier to apply and to pursue the main purpose of existence and to create further innovations in our Cream Line. The new release brings tremendous performance improvements, as well as integration will be much easier for any platform, exchange or integrator. Wallets are available to Releases tab on github
WALLETS

Multi-wallet support

Cream Core now supports loading multiple, separate wallets. The wallets are completely separated, with individual balances, keys and received transactions. Multi-wallet is enabled by using more than one -wallet argument when starting Creamcoin, either on the command line or in the Cream config file. In Creamcoin-Qt, only the first wallet will be displayed and accessible for creating and signing transactions. GUI selectable multiple wallets will be supported in a future version. This feature will continue to be refined with later updates, as there are still some known issues in using the GUI to access the “multiwallet” command. The most notable is that you can’t use coin control features with multiple wallets loaded, or else you will likely retain the wrong wallet when attempting to switch wallets.
When running Cream Core with multi-wallet, wallet-level RPC methods must specify the wallet for which they’re intended in every request. HTTP RPC requests should be send to the :/wallet// endpoint, for example 127.0.0.1:8332/wallet/wallet1.dat/. bitcoin-cli commands should be run with a -rpcwallet option, for example [bitcoin-cli -rpcwallet=wallet1.dat getbalance] A new node-level [listwallets] RPC method is added to display which wallets are currently loaded. Starting command for both wallets should look like this: [creamd -daemon -wallet=wallet1.dat -wallet=wallet2.dat]

Hardware Wallet native compatibility

With a new release of Cream Core the possibility is added in the form of use hardware wallets (Ledger, Trezor, Digital BitBox, KeepKey, Coldcard), but this process is manual and involves the use of Hardware Wallet Interaction (HWI) tool and it needs HW support and addition of Cream in the future, which is not excluded from roadmap. This is a great news for everyone who use Cream Core, and want extra security. Only applies to those who can use command line/CLI (for now), and when some of Hardware wallets actually supports Cream.

SegWit 4MB limit

SegWit replacing the block size limit with a block “weight” limit, allowing up to 4 megabytes of transaction data, and giving a substantial boost in the transaction capacity of the Cream network.

www.creamcoin.com

In the same with the new code update, Creamcoin Team is doing major shifting power, migrating the marketing and promotion activities, from our news site cream.technology to our main page www.creamcoin.com. We will come up with additional statement in this matter, so our supporters and followers have better perspective of Cream Line and the products of it.
In the meantime we are looking into new ways that developers can enhance the capabilities of the Creamcoin protocol, integration of decentralized exchange functionality, lightning network and number of other options that would allow for different types of conditional sends of Creamcoin assets. We are inviting any individual, platform, exchange or integrator who would like to submit recommendations or feature requests, feel free to contribute to the Creamcoin Github.
By Cream Team
submitted by creamcointeam to u/creamcointeam [link] [comments]

Bitcoin Price Prediction 2020

Bitcoin Price Prediction 2020
Bitcoin is a digital and fully decentralized currency. Decentralization of the network is the main goal of the Bitcoin. The fundamental achievement of bitcoin is its genuine peer-to-peer payment system; no person or even institution was “in charge” of bitcoin.
by StealthEX
Three main ideas were embedded in the Bitcoin code:
• Bitcoin should not be regulated by anyone.
• Its emission should not be infinite.
• The cost of a coin depends on its demand.
The maximum number of bitcoins – 21 million, and the possibility of their extraction were laid in the bitcoin algorithm.
Bitcoin “halving” occurred on 11 May 2020. This means that its miners’ remuneration was halved.

Bitcoin statistics

Source: CoinMarketCap, Data was taken on 19 May 2020.
Current Price $9,672.54
ROI since launch 7,048.96%
Market Cap $177,790,148,642
Market Rank #1
Circulating Supply 18,380,918 BTC
Total Supply 18,380,918 BTC

Bitcoin achievements and future plans

Bitcoin in 2019:

Bitcoin Core released:
• Improved Partially Signed Bitcoin Transaction (PSBT) support and added support for output script descriptors. This allowed it to be used with the first released version of the Hardware Wallet Interface (HWI).
• Implemented the new CPFP carve-out mempool policy, added initial support for BIP158-style compact block filters (currently RPC only), improved security by disabling protocols such as BIP37 bloom filters and BIP70 payment requests by default. It also switches GUI users to bech32 addresses by default.
LND released:
• Support for Static Channel Backups (SCBs) that help users recover any funds settled in their LN channels even if they’ve lost their recent channel state.
• Improved autopilot to help users open new channels, plus built-in compatibility with Lightning Loop for moving funds onchain without closing a channel or using a custodian.
• Added support for using a watchtower to guard your channels when you’re offline.
• Added support for a more extensible onion format, improved backup safety, and improved the watchtower support.
Other:
• Its price has more than doubled.
• For the first time in history Bitcoin was assigned a rating of “A”.
• British court recognized Bitcoin as property.
• The second largest in Germany and ninth in Europe, the Stuttgart Stock Exchange launched Bitcoin spot trading.
• In Russia, for the first time, Bitcoin was added to the authorized capital of a company.
• Bitcoin Named the Best Asset of the Decade by Bank of America Merrill Lynch.

Bitcoin in 2020:

• Focus on the Lightning Network. The continuation of work on c-lightning (Blockstream), Eclair (ACINQ), LND (Lightning Labs) and Rust Lightning to develop the protocol.
• Expectation of the SchnorTaproot softfork in 2020 or 2021 that is improvement in fungibility, privacy, scalability and functionality.
Bitcoin “halving” occurred on 11 May 2020.
• Amid the general crisis caused by coronavirus pandemic (COVID-19) and the depreciation of money, the Bitcoin value is growing.

Bitcoin Technical Analysis

Source: TradingView, Data was taken on 19 May 2020.

Bitcoin Price Prediction 2020

TradingBeasts BTC price prediction

The Bitcoin price is forecasted to reach $8,681 (-10.25%) by the beginning of June 2020. At the end of 2020 BTC price will be $8,345 (-13.72%).

Wallet investor Bitcoin price prediction

Bitcoin price prediction: maximum price by the end of December 2020 $13,559 (+40.19%), a minimum price $7,886 (-18.47%).

DigitalCoinPrice Bitcoin forecast

There will be a positive trend in the future and the BTC might be good for investing. BTC price will be equal to $22,501 at the end of 2020 (+132.63%).

Crypto-Rating BTC price forecast

Based on historical data Bitcoin price will be at $12,272 (+26.87%) in 1 week and $13,338 (+37.90%) in 1 month. Analysis of the cryptocurrency market shows that Bitcoin price may reach $18,679 (+93.11%) by the 1st of January 2021 driven by the potential interest from large institutional investors and more regulation expected in the field of digital currencies.

Buy Bitcoin at StealthEX

Bitcoin (BTC) is available for exchange on StealthEX with a low fee. Follow these easy steps:
✔ Choose the pair and the amount for your exchange. For example ETH to BTC.
✔ Press the “Start exchange” button.
✔ Provide the recipient address to which the coins will be transferred.
✔ Move your cryptocurrency for the exchange.
✔ Receive your coins.
The views and opinions expressed here are solely those of the author. Every investment and trading move involves risk. You should conduct your own research when making a decision.
Original article was posted on https://stealthex.io/blog/2020/05/19/bitcoin-price-prediction-2020/
submitted by Stealthex_io to u/Stealthex_io [link] [comments]

Solve the "storage, mining pool and exchange centralization", and only generate 1G data every year(only pc-miner)

The blockheader has two segments with a total length of 64 bit0 (of which blocktime is 64 bits), which strongly prevents the collapse effect of the sha256 operation in the ASIC miner, so that the mining difficulty will not increase indefinitely. The centralization for the high hashrate of the mining pool is strongly restricted. Census and prune the transactions (at most 4 outputs per transaction) whose all outputs are spent,in the block below 1300 depth in batches(i.e. clear up the input and output at the same time, and only keep the version of all-outs-spent transaction on the disk,--not serialize vin and vout). 250 for each batch, 20 block files(one file per block) will be reconstructed for each block received from other nodes, that is to say, 5000 transactions will be pruned at a time. And special mechanism is used to make the synchronization of data from malicious nodes error free. Only 1G data is increased every year. The data it running for 1000 years will be no more than 1T. Block size is 2M, and only 1g data is increased every year without SPV, which strongly prevents the storage of a large number of block data reducing the number of nodes. At the same time, 'four outputs per tx' limit the settlement of the mining pool, and strongly prevent the centralization of the mining pool. For example, the settlement is sent to 4000 miners, which requires 1000 transactions. All currencies are locked in the maturity of 300 blocks (the input can only be used as prevout after 300 blocks), which strongly prevents the frequency of trading speculation, the crash from the online exchange, and prevent the centralization of the biggest online exchange in the world.
This has achieved "absolute decentralization".
At present, the tip height is only 600, and there is no pre-mined. The RPC is stable and reliable same as bitcoin 0.10.2. No segwit but P2SH, a little change based on 0.10.2. Usage: $ /download-directory/bitcoind -addnode =47.114.58.108 (same for Ubuntu) with bitcoin.conf configuration file
Detailed introduction,original text is as follows: github-holyangel250-bitsupercoin
submitted by DangerousDetail8 to BitcoinMining [link] [comments]

Solve the "storage, mining pool and exchange centralization", and only generate 1G data every year

The blockheader has two segments with a total length of 64 bit0 (of which blocktime is 64 bits), which strongly prevents the collapse effect of the sha256 operation in the ASIC miner, so that the mining difficulty will not increase indefinitely. The centralization for the high hashrate of the mining pool is strongly restricted. Census and prune the transactions (at most 4 outputs per transaction) whose all outputs are spent,in the block below 1300 depth in batches(i.e. clear up the input and output at the same time, and only keep the version of all-outs-spent transaction on the disk,--not serialize vin and vout). 250 for each batch, 20 block files(one file per block) will be reconstructed for each block received from other nodes, that is to say, 5000 transactions will be pruned at a time. And special mechanism is used to make the synchronization of data from malicious nodes error free. Only 1G data is increased every year. The data it running for 1000 years will be no more than 1T. Block size is 2M, and only 1g data is increased every year without SPV, which strongly prevents the storage of a large number of block data reducing the number of nodes. At the same time, 'four outputs per tx' limit the settlement of the mining pool, and strongly prevent the centralization of the mining pool. For example, the settlement is sent to 4000 miners, which requires 1000 transactions. All currencies are locked in the maturity of 300 blocks (the input can only be used as prevout after 300 blocks), which strongly prevents the frequency of trading speculation, the crash from the online exchange, and prevent the centralization of the biggest online exchange in the world.
This has achieved "absolute decentralization".
At present, the tip height is only 600, and there is no pre-mined. The RPC is stable and reliable same as bitcoin 0.10.2. No segwit but P2SH, a little change based on 0.10.2. Usage: $ /download-directory/bitcoind -addnode =47.114.58.108 (same for Ubuntu) with bitcoin.conf configuration file
Detailed introduction,original text is as follows: github-holyangel250-bitsupercoin
submitted by DangerousDetail8 to BitcoinSerious [link] [comments]

Solve the "storage, mining pool and exchange centralization", and only generate 1G data every year

The blockheader has two segments with a total length of 64 bit0 (of which blocktime is 64 bits), which strongly prevents the collapse effect of the sha256 operation in the ASIC miner, so that the mining difficulty will not increase indefinitely. The centralization for the high hashrate of the mining pool is strongly restricted. Census and prune the transactions (at most 4 outputs per transaction) whose all outputs are spent,in the block below 1300 depth in batches(i.e. clear up the input and output at the same time, and only keep the version of all-outs-spent transaction on the disk,--not serialize vin and vout). 250 for each batch, 20 block files(one file per block) will be reconstructed for each block received from other nodes, that is to say, 5000 transactions will be pruned at a time. And special mechanism is used to make the synchronization of data from malicious nodes error free. Only 1G data is increased every year. The data it running for 1000 years will be no more than 1T. Block size is 2M, and only 1g data is increased every year without SPV, which strongly prevents the storage of a large number of block data reducing the number of nodes. At the same time, 'four outputs per tx' limit the settlement of the mining pool, and strongly prevent the centralization of the mining pool. For example, the settlement is sent to 4000 miners, which requires 1000 transactions. All currencies are locked in the maturity of 300 blocks (the input can only be used as prevout after 300 blocks), which strongly prevents the frequency of trading speculation, the crash from the online exchange, and prevent the centralization of the biggest online exchange in the world.
This has achieved "absolute decentralization".
At present, the tip height is only 600, and there is no pre-mined. The RPC is stable and reliable same as bitcoin 0.10.2. No segwit but P2SH, a little change based on 0.10.2. Usage: $ /download-directory/bitcoind -addnode =47.114.58.108 (same for Ubuntu) with bitcoin.conf configuration file
Detailed introduction,original text is as follows: github-holyangel250-bitsupercoin
submitted by DangerousDetail8 to altcoin_news [link] [comments]

Groestlcoin 6th Anniversary Release

Introduction

Dear Groestlers, it goes without saying that 2020 has been a difficult time for millions of people worldwide. The groestlcoin team would like to take this opportunity to wish everyone our best to everyone coping with the direct and indirect effects of COVID-19. Let it bring out the best in us all and show that collectively, we can conquer anything.
The centralised banks and our national governments are facing unprecedented times with interest rates worldwide dropping to record lows in places. Rest assured that this can only strengthen the fundamentals of all decentralised cryptocurrencies and the vision that was seeded with Satoshi's Bitcoin whitepaper over 10 years ago. Despite everything that has been thrown at us this year, the show must go on and the team will still progress and advance to continue the momentum that we have developed over the past 6 years.
In addition to this, we'd like to remind you all that this is Groestlcoin's 6th Birthday release! In terms of price there have been some crazy highs and lows over the years (with highs of around $2.60 and lows of $0.000077!), but in terms of value– Groestlcoin just keeps getting more valuable! In these uncertain times, one thing remains clear – Groestlcoin will keep going and keep innovating regardless. On with what has been worked on and completed over the past few months.

UPDATED - Groestlcoin Core 2.18.2

This is a major release of Groestlcoin Core with many protocol level improvements and code optimizations, featuring the technical equivalent of Bitcoin v0.18.2 but with Groestlcoin-specific patches. On a general level, most of what is new is a new 'Groestlcoin-wallet' tool which is now distributed alongside Groestlcoin Core's other executables.
NOTE: The 'Account' API has been removed from this version which was typically used in some tip bots. Please ensure you check the release notes from 2.17.2 for details on replacing this functionality.

How to Upgrade?

Windows
If you are running an older version, shut it down. Wait until it has completely shut down (which might take a few minutes for older versions), then run the installer.
OSX
If you are running an older version, shut it down. Wait until it has completely shut down (which might take a few minutes for older versions), run the dmg and drag Groestlcoin Core to Applications.
Ubuntu
http://groestlcoin.org/forum/index.php?topic=441.0

Other Linux

http://groestlcoin.org/forum/index.php?topic=97.0

Download

Download the Windows Installer (64 bit) here
Download the Windows Installer (32 bit) here
Download the Windows binaries (64 bit) here
Download the Windows binaries (32 bit) here
Download the OSX Installer here
Download the OSX binaries here
Download the Linux binaries (64 bit) here
Download the Linux binaries (32 bit) here
Download the ARM Linux binaries (64 bit) here
Download the ARM Linux binaries (32 bit) here

Source

ALL NEW - Groestlcoin Moonshine iOS/Android Wallet

Built with React Native, Moonshine utilizes Electrum-GRS's JSON-RPC methods to interact with the Groestlcoin network.
GRS Moonshine's intended use is as a hot wallet. Meaning, your keys are only as safe as the device you install this wallet on. As with any hot wallet, please ensure that you keep only a small, responsible amount of Groestlcoin on it at any given time.

Features

Download

iOS
Android

Source

ALL NEW! – HODL GRS Android Wallet

HODL GRS connects directly to the Groestlcoin network using SPV mode and doesn't rely on servers that can be hacked or disabled.
HODL GRS utilizes AES hardware encryption, app sandboxing, and the latest security features to protect users from malware, browser security holes, and even physical theft. Private keys are stored only in the secure enclave of the user's phone, inaccessible to anyone other than the user.
Simplicity and ease-of-use is the core design principle of HODL GRS. A simple recovery phrase (which we call a Backup Recovery Key) is all that is needed to restore the user's wallet if they ever lose or replace their device. HODL GRS is deterministic, which means the user's balance and transaction history can be recovered just from the backup recovery key.

Features

Download

Main Release (Main Net)
Testnet Release

Source

ALL NEW! – GroestlcoinSeed Savior

Groestlcoin Seed Savior is a tool for recovering BIP39 seed phrases.
This tool is meant to help users with recovering a slightly incorrect Groestlcoin mnemonic phrase (AKA backup or seed). You can enter an existing BIP39 mnemonic and get derived addresses in various formats.
To find out if one of the suggested addresses is the right one, you can click on the suggested address to check the address' transaction history on a block explorer.

Features

Live Version (Not Recommended)

https://www.groestlcoin.org/recovery/

Download

https://github.com/Groestlcoin/mnemonic-recovery/archive/master.zip

Source

ALL NEW! – Vanity Search Vanity Address Generator

NOTE: NVidia GPU or any CPU only. AMD graphics cards will not work with this address generator.
VanitySearch is a command-line Segwit-capable vanity Groestlcoin address generator. Add unique flair when you tell people to send Groestlcoin. Alternatively, VanitySearch can be used to generate random addresses offline.
If you're tired of the random, cryptic addresses generated by regular groestlcoin clients, then VanitySearch is the right choice for you to create a more personalized address.
VanitySearch is a groestlcoin address prefix finder. If you want to generate safe private keys, use the -s option to enter your passphrase which will be used for generating a base key as for BIP38 standard (VanitySearch.exe -s "My PassPhrase" FXPref). You can also use VanitySearch.exe -ps "My PassPhrase" which will add a crypto secure seed to your passphrase.
VanitySearch may not compute a good grid size for your GPU, so try different values using -g option in order to get the best performances. If you want to use GPUs and CPUs together, you may have best performances by keeping one CPU core for handling GPU(s)/CPU exchanges (use -t option to set the number of CPU threads).

Features

Usage

https://github.com/Groestlcoin/VanitySearch#usage

Download

Source

ALL NEW! – Groestlcoin EasyVanity 2020

Groestlcoin EasyVanity 2020 is a windows app built from the ground-up and makes it easier than ever before to create your very own bespoke bech32 address(es) when whilst not connected to the internet.
If you're tired of the random, cryptic bech32 addresses generated by regular Groestlcoin clients, then Groestlcoin EasyVanity2020 is the right choice for you to create a more personalised bech32 address. This 2020 version uses the new VanitySearch to generate not only legacy addresses (F prefix) but also Bech32 addresses (grs1 prefix).

Features

Download

Source

Remastered! – Groestlcoin WPF Desktop Wallet (v2.19.0.18)

Groestlcoin WPF is an alternative full node client with optional lightweight 'thin-client' mode based on WPF. Windows Presentation Foundation (WPF) is one of Microsoft's latest approaches to a GUI framework, used with the .NET framework. Its main advantages over the original Groestlcoin client include support for exporting blockchain.dat and including a lite wallet mode.
This wallet was previously deprecated but has been brought back to life with modern standards.

Features

Remastered Improvements

Download

Source

ALL NEW! – BIP39 Key Tool

Groestlcoin BIP39 Key Tool is a GUI interface for generating Groestlcoin public and private keys. It is a standalone tool which can be used offline.

Features

Download

Windows
Linux :
 pip3 install -r requirements.txt python3 bip39\_gui.py 

Source

ALL NEW! – Electrum Personal Server

Groestlcoin Electrum Personal Server aims to make using Electrum Groestlcoin wallet more secure and more private. It makes it easy to connect your Electrum-GRS wallet to your own full node.
It is an implementation of the Electrum-grs server protocol which fulfils the specific need of using the Electrum-grs wallet backed by a full node, but without the heavyweight server backend, for a single user. It allows the user to benefit from all Groestlcoin Core's resource-saving features like pruning, blocks only and disabled txindex. All Electrum-GRS's feature-richness like hardware wallet integration, multi-signature wallets, offline signing, seed recovery phrases, coin control and so on can still be used, but connected only to the user's own full node.
Full node wallets are important in Groestlcoin because they are a big part of what makes the system be trust-less. No longer do people have to trust a financial institution like a bank or PayPal, they can run software on their own computers. If Groestlcoin is digital gold, then a full node wallet is your own personal goldsmith who checks for you that received payments are genuine.
Full node wallets are also important for privacy. Using Electrum-GRS under default configuration requires it to send (hashes of) all your Groestlcoin addresses to some server. That server can then easily spy on your transactions. Full node wallets like Groestlcoin Electrum Personal Server would download the entire blockchain and scan it for the user's own addresses, and therefore don't reveal to anyone else which Groestlcoin addresses they are interested in.
Groestlcoin Electrum Personal Server can also broadcast transactions through Tor which improves privacy by resisting traffic analysis for broadcasted transactions which can link the IP address of the user to the transaction. If enabled this would happen transparently whenever the user simply clicks "Send" on a transaction in Electrum-grs wallet.
Note: Currently Groestlcoin Electrum Personal Server can only accept one connection at a time.

Features

Download

Windows
Linux / OSX (Instructions)

Source

UPDATED – Android Wallet 7.38.1 - Main Net + Test Net

The app allows you to send and receive Groestlcoin on your device using QR codes and URI links.
When using this app, please back up your wallet and email them to yourself! This will save your wallet in a password protected file. Then your coins can be retrieved even if you lose your phone.

Changes

Download

Main Net
Main Net (FDroid)
Test Net

Source

UPDATED – Groestlcoin Sentinel 3.5.06 (Android)

Groestlcoin Sentinel is a great solution for anyone who wants the convenience and utility of a hot wallet for receiving payments directly into their cold storage (or hardware wallets).
Sentinel accepts XPUB's, YPUB'S, ZPUB's and individual Groestlcoin address. Once added you will be able to view balances, view transactions, and (in the case of XPUB's, YPUB's and ZPUB's) deterministically generate addresses for that wallet.
Groestlcoin Sentinel is a fork of Groestlcoin Samourai Wallet with all spending and transaction building code removed.

Changes

Download

Source

UPDATED – P2Pool Test Net

Changes

Download

Pre-Hosted Testnet P2Pool is available via http://testp2pool.groestlcoin.org:21330/static/

Source

submitted by Yokomoko_Saleen to groestlcoin [link] [comments]

How to add a Trezor wallet to Bitcoin Core as watch-only

I wanted to use Bitcoin Core to keep an eye on transactions (basically using your own full Bitcoin node to validate, instead of "trusting" Satoshilabs and their webwallet). This doesn't mean there's anything wrong with Satoshilabls' trezor web wallet - it's just a matter of being totally sovereign/independent - if you want that, then using your own Bitcoin Core full node is a must.
Spent some time investigating how to do that, so sharing here in case someone wants it. Feel free to point any ways to do it better.
How-To:
  1. Go to the usual Trezor wallet site, then open the wallet you want to import to Core (don't forget passphrase if needed). Copy the ypub text string.
  2. Convert the ypub to xpub using something like this: https://jlopp.github.io/xpub-converte You can save the page and run it offline/airgapped in something like Tails if you don't trust it. There is no security risk (not a private key) but only privacy risk (with your public keys the site can see all transactions/balances of that wallet)
  3. Put the xpub in a Core RPC importmulti command with this formatting:
    importmulti '[{"range": [0, 1000], "timestamp": "now", "keypool": true, "watchonly": true, "desc": "wpkh([000000f1/84h/0h/0h]your_xpub_goes_here/0/*)#7x87wdy3", "internal": false}, {"range": [0, 1000], "timestamp": "now", "keypool": true, "watchonly": true, "desc": "wpkh([000000f1/84h/0h/0h]your_xpub_goes_here/1/*)#0jzlnc5f", "internal": true}]' 
Then open Bitcoin Core and do these other steps...
  1. In File>Create Wallet, create a wallet with "No Encryption" & "Watch Only" - call it anything you like (TrezorA for example).
  2. Open Window>Console, select the wallet you just created (on the pull-down menu at the top) and then paste the importmulti command where you put your xpub.
  3. Core will complain that the checksum is wrong (the "7x87wdy3" and "wdxy2s2t" parts in my example) replace them with the right ones shown in the message and retry.
  4. You should see the wallet imported with success, but with no transaction history. It is necessary to rescan the chain to index the transactions that wallet made. To save time, you can use the blockheight of the first block where you made a transaction with that trezor, for example: "rescanblockchain 590500".
You can find out the block by putting the hash of your first transfer in a block explorer like https://live.blockcypher.com/, look for "blockheight" If you have no idea which block has your first transaction, you can just rescan the whole chain by typing "rescanblockchain 0" in the console (but Core will take way longer to do it).
That's about it, all transactions made from what wallet should then appear in Core and it will warn every time funds are received or spent. You can be running your own full node and constantly monitoring your wallet, without having to use the Trezor or load Satoshilab's site.
You cannot spend from that wallet in Core, but you can use it to generate receive addresses and send to it (keep in mind that if you generate bech32 addresses in Core, those transfers will not appear at Trezor wallet since it doesn't support it yet :| )
Edit: Forgot change addresses, fixed importmulti example.
submitted by beowulfpt to TREZOR [link] [comments]

A welcome message to developers from Bitcoin.com's Developer Services lead, Gabriel Cardona.

Hi, my name is Gabriel, I lead Developer Services at bitcoin.com. We have a suite of developer tools which should be familiar to an ETH dev.
https://developer.bitcoin.com is the home of all our developer documentation
https://developer.bitcoin.com/bitbox/ is our typescript framework similar to truffle
https://developer.bitcoin.com/slp is for creating, minting, sending and burning tokens. It's also a superset of BITBOX SDK
rest.bitcoin.com - this is the json rpc over http
https://bitdb.bitcoin.com - real time indexer of BCH blockchain in to mongodb collections
https://bitsocket.bitcoin.com - bitbd data in real-time over websockets
https://slpdb.bitcoin.com - entire token graph in mongodb collections
https://slpsocket.bitcoin.com - slpdb data in real-time over websockets
Badger is our fork of MetaMask for BCH:
Cashscript is our smart-contract language inspired by Solidity. It exports an Arifact w/ ABI
CashScript examples as .cash files and needed typescript files to transpile and run them
Testnet Faucet
Any of the above cloud services also works w/ testnet by adding a t to the beginning of the url. For example https://trest.bitcoin.com
We have a developer discord and a telegram room.
I'm @cgcardona and I'm happy to help on-ramp in any way. Cheers 🎩
Source.
submitted by MemoryDealers to btc [link] [comments]

Bitcoin Unlimited - Bitcoin Cash edition 1.6.0.0 has just been released

Download the latest Bitcoin Cash compatible release of Bitcoin Unlimited (1.6.0.0, April 24th, 2019) from:
 
https://www.bitcoinunlimited.info/download
 
This is a major release of Bitcoin Unlimited which it is compatible with the upcoming May 2019 BCH protocol upgrade; this release is also compatible with all the already activated Bitcoin Cash network upgrades, namely:
List of notable changes and fixes contained in BUcash 1.6.0.0:
 
Release notes: https://github.com/BitcoinUnlimited/BitcoinUnlimited/blob/dev/doc/release-notes/release-notes-bucash1.6.0.md
 
PS Ubuntu PPA repository is currently being updated to serve for BUcash 1.6.0.0.
submitted by s1ckpig to btc [link] [comments]

Nano timestamps

First off, big thanks to u/Matoking for his nanolib library, and thanks to https://www.alilnano.com/ for the nano to test with
---
TL;DR I made a small API that is able to timestamp strings and json in-real-time using the nano blockchain instead of using the bitcoin blockchain. Check it out here - http://134.209.54.121/ (will be moving it soon). I have a few questions near end of post:

Lately, I've worked on some DNA sequences that I'd like to maintain in the public domain (as a synthetic biologist). In order to do that, I thought it would be nice to timestamp the data I generated on a blockchain (this timestamp does not to be extremely specific, within a few days is fine). At first, I checked out https://opentimestamps.org/ which is a great project. HOWEVER - getting the block takes quite a few hours, which really sucks for integrating it into different applications (https://github.com/opentimestamps/opentimestamps-client/blob/masteREADME.md). I wanted to (nearly) instantly get a hash that can be attributed to a certain piece of data.

Here comes Nano, which is feeless and nearly instant, and so solves my problem. I like hacking little things together, so I made a small Flask app, code here https://github.com/Koeng101/nanotimestamps. You can check out the actual API at http://134.209.54.121/, try it out! (I'm still connected to mynano ninja, so I don't have enough api calls to begin integrating into things)

Questions:
  1. In my understanding, Nano's block lattice basically makes the 'frontier' blocks the only ones that are really saved in a decentralized manner, and previous blocks can be pruned (https://www.reddit.com/nanocurrency/comments/aqq6zm/nano_how_2_blocks_and_lattices/). How about unpocketed transactions? For example (if I remember correctly) xrb_3bejnuc1qx31a37147smsyuu568p7jkuy4yfneoohemqu8psy75g7rys7mck is the hash of 'Hello World', and there are a couple unpocketed transactions floating there, which can never be pocketed unless you can find the private key of that public key. Will those ever be pruned from the ledger?
    1. Is this an ethical project? If those transactions are never removed from the ledger (ie can't be pruned), then that means that every file or json I hash to save will now be bloating the ledger. I'm not too worried about the burn rate, since I only send 1 raw.
    2. How do I set up my node so I can do RPC calls to it? Sorry for being a noob, but I couldn't figure this one out. My node online node is here 134.209.61.219, and I just can't figure out how to remotely connect to it with RPC.
    3. Any other thoughts I should keep in mind?

Next steps:
  1. I bought the domain names nanotimestamps.com and nanotimestamps.org to set up a more official looking website
  2. I plan on adding in file upload to the API
  3. I plan on adding upgrading the CPU so I can solve the PoW quicker (main bottleneck)

Nano rocks! Thanks for being awesome people.
submitted by koeng101 to nanocurrency [link] [comments]

⚡ Lightning Network Megathread ⚡

Last updated 2018-01-29
This post is a collaboration with the Bitcoin community to create a one-stop source for Lightning Network information.
There are still questions in the FAQ that are unanswered, if you know the answer and can provide a source please do so!

⚡What is the Lightning Network? ⚡

Explanations:

Image Explanations:

Specifications / White Papers

Videos

Lightning Network Experts on Reddit

  • starkbot - (Elizabeth Stark - Lightning Labs)
  • roasbeef - (Olaoluwa Osuntokun - Lightning Labs)
  • stile65 - (Alex Akselrod - Lightning Labs)
  • cfromknecht - (Conner Fromknecht - Lightning Labs)
  • RustyReddit - (Rusty Russell - Blockstream)
  • cdecker - (Christian Decker - Blockstream)
  • Dryja - (Tadge Dryja - Digital Currency Initiative)
  • josephpoon - (Joseph Poon)
  • fdrn - (Fabrice Drouin - ACINQ )
  • pmpadiou - (Pierre-Marie Padiou - ACINQ)

Lightning Network Experts on Twitter

  • @starkness - (Elizabeth Stark - Lightning Labs)
  • @roasbeef - (Olaoluwa Osuntokun - Lightning Labs)
  • @stile65 - (Alex Akselrod - Lightning Labs)
  • @bitconner - (Conner Fromknecht - Lightning Labs)
  • @johanth - (Johan Halseth - Lightning Labs)
  • @bvu - (Bryan Vu - Lightning Labs)
  • @rusty_twit - (Rusty Russell - Blockstream)
  • @snyke - (Christian Decker - Blockstream)
  • @JackMallers - (Jack Mallers - Zap)
  • @tdryja - (Tadge Dryja - Digital Currency Initiative)
  • @jcp - (Joseph Poon)
  • @alexbosworth - (Alex Bosworth - yalls.org)

Medium Posts

Learning Resources

Books

Desktop Interfaces

Web Interfaces

Tutorials and resources

Lightning on Testnet

Lightning Wallets

Place a testnet transaction

Altcoin Trading using Lightning

  • ZigZag - Disclaimer You must trust ZigZag to send to Target Address

Lightning on Mainnet

Warning - Testing should be done on Testnet

Atomic Swaps

Developer Documentation and Resources

Lightning implementations

  • LND - Lightning Network Daemon (Golang)
  • eclair - A Scala implementation of the Lightning Network (Scala)
  • c-lightning - A Lightning Network implementation in C
  • lit - Lightning Network node software (Golang)
  • lightning-onion - Onion Routed Micropayments for the Lightning Network (Golang)
  • lightning-integration - Lightning Integration Testing Framework
  • ptarmigan - C++ BOLT-Compliant Lightning Network Implementation [Incomplete]

Libraries

Lightning Network Visualizers/Explorers

Testnet

Mainnet

Payment Processors

  • BTCPay - Next stable version will include Lightning Network

Community

Slack

IRC

Slack Channel

Discord Channel

Miscellaneous

⚡ Lightning FAQs ⚡

If you can answer please PM me and include source if possible. Feel free to help keep these answers up to date and as brief but correct as possible
Is Lightning Bitcoin?
Yes. You pick a peer and after some setup, create a bitcoin transaction to fund the lightning channel; it’ll then take another transaction to close it and release your funds. You and your peer always hold a bitcoin transaction to get your funds whenever you want: just broadcast to the blockchain like normal. In other words, you and your peer create a shared account, and then use Lightning to securely negotiate who gets how much from that shared account, without waiting for the bitcoin blockchain.
Is the Lightning Network open source?
Yes, Lightning is open source. Anyone can review the code (in the same way as the bitcoin code)
Who owns and controls the Lightning Network?
Similar to the bitcoin network, no one will ever own or control the Lightning Network. The code is open source and free for anyone to download and review. Anyone can run a node and be part of the network.
I’ve heard that Lightning transactions are happening “off-chain”…Does that mean that my bitcoin will be removed from the blockchain?
No, your bitcoin will never leave the blockchain. Instead your bitcoin will be held in a multi-signature address as long as your channel stays open. When the channel is closed; the final transaction will be added to the blockchain. “Off-chain” is not a perfect term, but it is used due to the fact that the transfer of ownership is no longer reflected on the blockchain until the channel is closed.
Do I need a constant connection to run a lightning node?
Not necessarily,
Example: A and B have a channel. 1 BTC each. A sends B 0.5 BTC. B sends back 0.25 BTC. Balance should be A = 0.75, B = 1.25. If A gets disconnected, B can publish the first Tx where the balance was A = 0.5 and B = 1.5. If the node B does in fact attempt to cheat by publishing an old state (such as the A=0.5 and B=1.5 state), this cheat can then be detected on-chain and used to steal the cheaters funds, i.e., A can see the closing transaction, notice it's an old one and grab all funds in the channel (A=2, B=0). The time that A has in order to react to the cheating counterparty is given by the CheckLockTimeVerify (CLTV) in the cheating transaction, which is adjustable. So if A foresees that it'll be able to check in about once every 24 hours it'll require that the CLTV is at least that large, if it's once a week then that's fine too. You definitely do not need to be online and watching the chain 24/7, just make sure to check in once in a while before the CLTV expires. Alternatively you can outsource the watch duties, in order to keep the CLTV timeouts low. This can be achieved both with trusted third parties or untrusted ones (watchtowers). In the case of a unilateral close, e.g., you just go offline and never come back, the other endpoint will have to wait for that timeout to expire to get its funds back. So peers might not accept channels with extremely high CLTV timeouts. -- Source
What Are Lightning’s Advantages?
Tiny payments are possible: since fees are proportional to the payment amount, you can pay a fraction of a cent; accounting is even done in thousandths of a satoshi. Payments are settled instantly: the money is sent in the time it takes to cross the network to your destination and back, typically a fraction of a second.
Does Lightning require Segregated Witness?
Yes, but not in theory. You could make a poorer lightning network without it, which has higher risks when establishing channels (you might have to wait a month if things go wrong!), has limited channel lifetime, longer minimum payment expiry times on each hop, is less efficient and has less robust outsourcing. The entire spec as written today assumes segregated witness, as it solves all these problems.
Can I Send Funds From Lightning to a Normal Bitcoin Address?
No, for now. For the first version of the protocol, if you wanted to send a normal bitcoin transaction using your channel, you have to close it, send the funds, then reopen the channel (3 transactions). In future versions, you and your peer would agree to spend out of your lightning channel funds just like a normal bitcoin payment, allowing you to use your lightning wallet like a normal bitcoin wallet.
Can I Make Money Running a Lightning Node?
Not really. Anyone can set up a node, and so it’s a race to the bottom on fees. In practice, we may see the network use a nominal fee and not change very much, which only provides an incremental incentive to route on a node you’re going to use yourself, and not enough to run one merely for fees. Having clients use criteria other than fees (e.g. randomness, diversity) in route selection will also help this.
What is the release date for Lightning on Mainnet?
Lightning is already being tested on the Mainnet Twitter Link but as for a specific date, Jameson Lopp says it best
Would there be any KYC/AML issues with certain nodes?
Nope, because there is no custody ever involved. It's just like forwarding packets. -- Source
What is the delay time for the recipient of a transaction receiving confirmation?
Furthermore, the Lightning Network scales not with the transaction throughput of the underlying blockchain, but with modern data processing and latency limits - payments can be made nearly as quickly as packets can be sent. -- Source
How does the lightning network prevent centralization?
Bitcoin Stack Exchange Answer
What are Channel Factories and how do they work?
Bitcoin Stack Exchange Answer
How does the Lightning network work in simple terms?
Bitcoin Stack Exchange Answer
How are paths found in Lightning Network?
Bitcoin Stack Exchange Answer
How would the lightning network work between exchanges?
Each exchange will get to decide and need to implement the software into their system, but some ideas have been outlined here: Google Doc - Lightning Exchanges
Note that by virtue of the usual benefits of cost-less, instantaneous transactions, lightning will make arbitrage between exchanges much more efficient and thus lead to consistent pricing across exchange that adopt it. -- Source
How do lightning nodes find other lightning nodes?
Stack Exchange Answer
Does every user need to store the state of the complete Lightning Network?
According to Rusty's calculations we should be able to store 1 million nodes in about 100 MB, so that should work even for mobile phones. Beyond that we have some proposals ready to lighten the load on endpoints, but we'll cross that bridge when we get there. -- Source
Would I need to download the complete state every time I open the App and make a payment?
No you'd remember the information from the last time you started the app and only sync the differences. This is not yet implemented, but it shouldn't be too hard to get a preliminary protocol working if that turns out to be a problem. -- Source
What needs to happen for the Lightning Network to be deployed and what can I do as a user to help?
Lightning is based on participants in the network running lightning node software that enables them to interact with other nodes. This does not require being a full bitcoin node, but you will have to run "lnd", "eclair", or one of the other node softwares listed above.
All lightning wallets have node software integrated into them, because that is necessary to create payment channels and conduct payments on the network, but you can also intentionally run lnd or similar for public benefit - e.g. you can hold open payment channels or channels with higher volume, than you need for your own transactions. You would be compensated in modest fees by those who transact across your node with multi-hop payments. -- Source
Is there anyway for someone who isn't a developer to meaningfully contribute?
Sure, you can help write up educational material. You can learn and read more about the tech at http://dev.lightning.community/resources. You can test the various desktop and mobile apps out there (Lightning Desktop, Zap, Eclair apps). -- Source
Do I need to be a miner to be a Lightning Network node?
No -- Source
Do I need to run a full Bitcoin node to run a lightning node?
lit doesn't depend on having your own full node -- it automatically connects to full nodes on the network. -- Source
LND uses a light client mode, so it doesn't require a full node. The name of the light client it uses is called neutrino
How does the lightning network stop "Cheating" (Someone broadcasting an old transaction)?
Upon opening a channel, the two endpoints first agree on a reserve value, below which the channel balance may not drop. This is to make sure that both endpoints always have some skin in the game as rustyreddit puts it :-)
For a cheat to become worth it, the opponent has to be absolutely sure that you cannot retaliate against him during the timeout. So he has to make sure you never ever get network connectivity during that time. Having someone else also watching for channel closures and notifying you, or releasing a canned retaliation, makes this even harder for the attacker. This is because if he misjudged you being truly offline you can retaliate by grabbing all of its funds. Spotty connections, DDoS, and similar will not provide the attacker the necessary guarantees to make cheating worthwhile. Any form of uncertainty about your online status acts as a deterrent to the other endpoint. -- Source
How many times would someone need to open and close their lightning channels?
You typically want to have more than one channel open at any given time for redundancy's sake. And we imagine open and close will probably be automated for the most part. In fact we already have a feature in LND called autopilot that can automatically open channels for a user.
Frequency will depend whether the funds are needed on-chain or more useful on LN. -- Source
Will the lightning network reduce BTC Liquidity due to "locking-up" funds in channels?
Stack Exchange Answer
Can the Lightning Network work on any other cryptocurrency? How?
Stack Exchange Answer
When setting up a Lightning Network Node are fees set for the entire node, or each channel when opened?
You don't really set up a "node" in the sense that anyone with more than one channel can automatically be a node and route payments. Fees on LN can be set by the node, and can change dynamically on the network. -- Source
Can Lightning routing fees be changed dynamically, without closing channels?
Yes but it has to be implemented in the Lightning software being used. -- Source
How can you make sure that there will be routes with large enough balances to handle transactions?
You won't have to do anything. With autopilot enabled, it'll automatically open and close channels based on the availability of the network. -- Source
How does the Lightning Network stop flooding nodes (DDoS) with micro transactions? Is this even an issue?
Stack Exchange Answer

Unanswered Questions

How do on-chain fees work when opening and closing channels? Who pays the fee?
How does the Lightning Network work for mobile users?
What are the best practices for securing a lightning node?
What is a lightning "hub"?
How does lightning handle cross chain (Atomic) swaps?

Special Thanks and Notes

  • Many links found from awesome-lightning-network github
  • Everyone who submitted a question or concern!
  • I'm continuing to format for an easier Mobile experience!
submitted by codedaway to Bitcoin [link] [comments]

Komodo and 'Blockchain Sovereignity'

jl777’s first law of blockchain dynamic:“Once the value of the assets exceeds the value of the underlying platform, it become irresistible to invent ‘taxes’ to extract a rent-seeking position”
In the ‘multi-chain’ category of blockchain platforms, Komodo stands out both as a pioneer and as the most extreme application of such design. Creating and running fully independent blockchains is one of Komodo main design features, so I want to talk a little about the concept of ‘blockchain sovereignity’ and how it compares with the competition.
First I need to define the meaning of blockchain sovereignity, I’ll offer this one:
Sovereignity is a project’s degree of independence from the platform it's built upon. The more its reliability, features and costs are immune from the base layer’s own reliability, features, costs, changes or events, the more it’s ‘sovereign’.
This concept isn’t much talked about in the cryto space but it’s going to grow in importance in future. Actually it’s already been important… in the past 6 years I’ve seen more than one project wrecked by backward incompatible changes on the underlying platform: does anyone remember Counterparty and the op_return story? Or when Vitalik tried first to build his idea on Bitcoin? Or the Supernet project on Nxt? So this is not just an abstract problem!
How does this concept apply to project built on Komodo technology? On Komodo they will enjoy by default the following ‘sovereign’ features:
  1. Every Smartchain is completely independent from Komodo and from each other
  2. It doesn’t cost any Komodo to create or use a Smartchain
  3. A Smartchain pays its own tx fees in its own native coin
  4. A Smartchain has its own open network of nodes, consensus rules and customization possibilities
In other words they’re all as independent blockchains as they can be, though they come with cross-chain interoperability. If aliens pulverized all Komodo nodes from orbit, any Smartchains would continue to work. Exactly like Litecoin would continue to work if Bitcoin disappeared or vice-versa. In fact anyone is free to create a fully functional Smartchain and it wouldn’t make difference if it never interacted with the rest of Komodo ecosystem!
How does such design compare with other multi-chain platforms?
Ethereum has by far the most developed infrastructure after Bitcoin. Now it’s under a gradual transition to a 2.0 version that should be completed sometimes between 2020 and 2021. Ethereum was born with a single chain design but the 2.0 plan has striking resemblances with a sort of multichain or bespoke architecture: the base layer will adopt a sharding technology and far larger use will be made of various 2nd layer scaling solutions: Plasma, State Channels, Payment Channels and ZK-STARKs. All of them come with different trade-offs but overall they should fix the scaling problems. Yet from the point of view of ‘sovereignity’ this design doesn’t offer much. Projects using 2nd layers solutions will be safe from congestion but their security, fees and interoperability will still be strongly dependent upon the base layer. Indeed their very existence depends on it, no plasma sidechain can exist without Ethereum! Despite a well developed smart contract technology, no real customizations are possible at the core level and the gas cost remains a concern for resource-intensive applications.
Polkadot was born specifically as a multichain scalable & interoperable protocol. Yet the chains based on it, called parachains, are strongly dependent on the base layer for security and only a limited number of parachain slots exist. Their number gets increaesed in time but, in order to avoid squatting, they must be won via an auction mechanism. Thus a parachain is only ‘rented’, working in practice like a subscription model. This design is very little reassuring from the ‘sovereignity’ point of view!
Ardor is a platform that allows to create individual ‘Child Chains’ for specific businesses or purposes. Such childchains have their own token but the Ardor token is still needed to pay for block creation purpose, so it comes with an automatic market-based exchange mechanism between them. Childchains are safe from congestion but still completely dependent on the base layer for security and survival. They come with smart contract and useful features but no advanced customizations are possible.
Cosmos is a network of independent application-specific blockchains, i.e. it allows to create custom blockchains using both prebuilt modules or creating your own. Cosmos is probably the one coming closer to Komodo in terms of sovereignity and customizations and it has many clever mechanisms and features that make it one of the most interesting projects in the crypto space. The customizations possibilities are greater than most competitors, yet compared to Komodo there are parts where it’s lacking: first the only consensus algo choice is Tendermint and don’t seem to be options to customize that. Then the Atom coins are required for transactions between blockchains and payment of commissions. And last the smart contract language is still interpreted and gas-based.
I think it’s fair to say that Komodo wins hands down in the blokchain ‘sovereignity’ category. But let’s also ask another important question: does ‘blockchain sovereignity’ really matter?
I’ve mentioned a few examples where it did make a huge difference, yet the proper answer is that it depends… there exists a very large spectrum of blockchain-based projects with very different needs!
At one end of the spectrum we find tokens with a temporary utility. At the other extreme there are mission-critical projects with highly customized features. For the former ‘sovereignity’ is of no importance. For the latter it can make the difference between working and catastrophe. Everything in the middle have to decide for itself on a case by case base.
I think tokens/colored coins are perfectly fine for the simplest cases.
Ethereum, Cosmos, Polkadot, Ardor and others are probably fine too for more advanced cases.
Komodo’s target market overlaps with them but its ultimate audience are the most ambitious and challenging projects, the ones needing full sovereignity and state-of-the-art customizations at the core level.
The base degree of independence enjoyed by developers using Komodo technology is further compounded by unique technological advances like the Antara framework.
With Antara any program, software, blockchain rule and feature can be coded into special purpose modules. ‘Smart contracts’ are just a subset of what Smartchains can be programmed to do. Anything is possible, including changes to core consensus rules. The modules are compiled with the daemon and run at native cpu speed, without gas fees or virtual machine.
Antara represents a qualitative jump above all existing ‘smart contract’ technologies, similar to the difference between Asic mining vs Cpu mining.
jl777:“It seems almost all other smartcontract solutions are just a variation on the self-limiting GAS model. You would think there would be a better solution, and there is. The transactionalized… model totally avoids the GAS issue, runs the custom code at native CPU speeds (not interpreted) and best of all the performance is not affected by any other project as you have your own Smartchain...”
The library of Antara modules continues expand and simple dApps can be created using the large set of rpc calls available from existing modules.
Developing an entire module from scratch isn’t stuff for weekend coders but any serious project looking for state-of-the-art custom solutions is certainly going to pay attention!
To recap, if you’re planning to use a platform to launch a blockchain-based project (especially a very complex one) there’s a set of questions that you must ask yourself before proceeding:
If the questions above matter to you, then it’s time to take the concept of ‘blockchain sovereignity’ seriously.
Jl777 “Smart projects that want to build a valuable use-case would want to minimize… all future incremental costs… ideally minimal or zero, like zero tax platform. Since this sounds too good to be true, most maybe don’t even imagine it is possible, but the smart projects will analyze these critical details...”
You may wonder why there aren’t more free platforms like Komodo? The reason is simple: all coin holders are concerned with finding use cases that give value to their coin. Moreover some platforms have big VC funders that want a return on their investment. So the more use cases the better: simple, isn’t it? Unfortunately this leads to short-sighted decisions, like forcing the use of a coin in any possible way or putting a cap on usage or ‘fee market’ fantasies.
Jl777 “Increasing tax rates might boost revenues temporarily from projects that are locked in, but as soon as the taxes become meaningful, every effort is made to migrate, regardless of the cost to migrate. Isn’t it better to start in a tax free zone?”
Komodo is unique in this regard, as it has made a deliberate design decision to be as much permissionless and free as possible. Some people find this design hard to understand: I could buy a Lambo if I had one dollar for every time someone asked “So what is Komodo use case?”. It takes some long-term vision to understand the benefits.
Komodo does have use-cases but none of them is obligatory or costly. Projects building on its technology are free to use Komodo or not to use it at all. They can design their own alternatives. They could even create a separate dPoW network! Yet Komodo remains the cheapest, simplest and most liquid option and center of its ecosystem. This fact alone ensures it’s going to be actually used.
MrKomodoWorld: “Instead of devising schemes to make projects pay, Komodo has devised schemes that prevents itself from forcing projects to pay”
submitted by KomodoWorld to CryptoCurrency [link] [comments]

Bitcoin JSON-RPC Tutorial 6 - JSON Parameters and Errors Programming Bitcoin-qt using the RPC api (1 of 6) Bitcoin JSON-RPC Tutorial 4 - Command Line Interface Bitcoin JSON-RPC Tutorial 5 - Your First Calls Bitcoin JSON-RPC Tutorial 7 - Wallet Notify

Running Bitcoin with the -server argument (or running bitcoind) tells it to function as a HTTP JSON-RPC server, but Basic access authentication must be used when communicating with it, and, for security, by default, the server only accepts connections from other processes on the same machine. If your HTTP or JSON library requires you to specify which 'realm' is authenticated, use 'jsonrpc'. Segregated Witness Wallet Development Guide. Most contents of this document could be found in the BIPs related to segregated witness, including BIP141, BIP143, BIP144, and BIP145.Please consider this as the first point of reference to other related documents, and as a checklist for what should and should not be done. Bitcoin is an innovative payment network and a new kind of money. Find all you need to know and get started with Bitcoin on bitcoin.org. Bitcoin.org is a community funded project, donations are appreciated and used to improve the website. Make a donation How to Do RPC Calls with C++ Bitcoind . bitcoin deamon = core value of the software (bitcoind -printtoconsole -debug=1) Bitcoind provide the RPC "interface" in which user can query with bitcoin-cli (or a library in c++). You must run bitcoind before using bitcoin-cli. BETA: This documentation has not been extensively reviewed by Bitcoin experts and so likely contains numerous errors. Please use the Issue and Edit links on the bottom left menu to help us improve. Click here to close this disclaimer. X The following guide aims to provide examples to help you startbuilding Bitcoin-bas

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Gold will be explosive, unlike anything we’ve seen says Canada’s billionaire Frank Giustra - Duration: 20:47. Kitco NEWS Recommended for you Bitcoin JSON-RPC tutorial. Handling JSON, entering parameters and receiving error messages. BTC: 1NPrfWgJfkANmd1jt88A141PjhiarT8d9U. Bitcoin JSON-RPC Tutorial 5 - Your First Calls - Duration: 10:06. m1xolyd1an 11,838 views. 10:06. Building a Blockchain in Under 15 Minutes - Programmer explains - Duration: 14:28. Bitcoin JSON-RPC Tutorial 5 - Your First Calls ... REST API concepts and examples - Duration: 8:53. WebConcepts 4,754,909 views. 8:53. Top Five Useful Knots for camping, ... Bitcoin JSON-RPC tutorial. Getting started with the bitcoin command line interface. My Book: https://www.amazon.com/Building-Bitcoin-Websites-Beginners-Devel...

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