Bitcoin is basically a Ponzi scheme | The Seattle Times

Bitcoin & Cryptocurrency Ponzi Schemes

Discussion of ponzi schemes that operate using cryptocurrency.
[link]

WeareSatoshi

[link]

Bitcoin Ponzi Schemes & Identifying Bitcoin Ponzi Games

Bitcoin Ponzi Schemes & Identifying Bitcoin Ponzi Games submitted by sandrozc to Crypto_Currencies [link] [comments]

Bitcoin Ponzi Schemes & Identifying Bitcoin Ponzi Games

submitted by MintDiceOfficial to Crypto_General [link] [comments]

I've created a fully automated bitcoin ponzi game and it's running since a week

I've created a fully automated bitcoin ponzi game and it's running since a week submitted by ponzigame to Bitcoin [link] [comments]

An open Bitcoin ponzi game. House only takes 1%. (Better than Open-Ponzi)

submitted by BitcoinAllBot to BitcoinAll [link] [comments]

At last a company where you trade Bitcoin from your own Crypto Exchange Via API ... Booom game over for the Ponzi scams where you send your deposit and pray 😜💯🔥

submitted by towlawrian to CryptoCurrencyTrading [link] [comments]

Bitcoin is not a Ponzi Scheme it’s more like an international game of Hot Potato

submitted by psntax to Buttcoin [link] [comments]

@CNBC: "I just don't see a legitimate use. I think it's game," says financial analyst Gary Shilling on why bitcoin is a Ponzi scheme. https://t.co/l2jM2rXmoe https://t.co/u9zZ2CRF1d

@CNBC: submitted by -en- to newsbotMARKET [link] [comments]

Nouriel Roubini: Bitcoin Is a ‘Ponzi Game’ - MoneyBeat

Nouriel Roubini: Bitcoin Is a ‘Ponzi Game’ - MoneyBeat submitted by Da_Funk0104 to Bitcoin [link] [comments]

Bitcoin mentioned around Reddit: Create a ponzi scheme, openly advertise it as such, and see how many people still invest thinking they can game the system. They can't call the cops, because you openly told them you'd be taking their /r/CrazyIdeas

Bitcoin mentioned around Reddit: Create a ponzi scheme, openly advertise it as such, and see how many people still invest thinking they can game the system. They can't call the cops, because you openly told them you'd be taking their /CrazyIdeas submitted by BitcoinAllBot to BitcoinAll [link] [comments]

My favorite daily BTC wisdom quotes - inspired by Roubini's tweet rants: "Bitcoin Is A Ponzi Game And A Conduit For Criminal Activities"

"If you think that a couple of twitter message is sufficient to prove or disprove the merit of BTC, you clearly have no any meaningful understanding of Bitcoin."
"Bitcoin has many features appealing to the logic, but the beauty of BTC is that it exists by the will of people, and without the need of the approval or permission of any particular individual."
"Nouriel - do me a favor. Please tell us the name of the person who do you think is the Ponzi of Bitcoin.
You know, the single person, who makes up the entire scheme and controls every single aspect of it, as it is done in every single case of a Ponzi scheme during the history."
Read more: http://www.businessinsider.com/roubini-bitcoin-is-a-ponzi-scheme-and-a-conduit-for-criminal-activities-2014-3#ixzz2vVypg6pS
submitted by BTCjoy to Bitcoin [link] [comments]

Introducing The Bitcoin Ponzi! A fun game for bitcoiners only!

submitted by TheBitcoinPonzi to Bitcoin [link] [comments]

Nouriel Roubini: Bitcoin Is a ‘Ponzi Game’ - MoneyBeat

Nouriel Roubini: Bitcoin Is a ‘Ponzi Game’ - MoneyBeat submitted by AgentZeroM to shitbitcoinhaterssay [link] [comments]

ROUBINI: 'Bitcoin Is A Ponzi Game And A Conduit For Criminal Activities'

ROUBINI: 'Bitcoin Is A Ponzi Game And A Conduit For Criminal Activities' submitted by BTCNews to BTCNews [link] [comments]

The Truth about Bitcoin?

Part 1/4 - NSA Connection:
First off, the SHA-256 algorithm, which stands for Secure Hash Algorithm 256, is a member of the SHA-2 cryptographic hash functions designed by the NSA and first published in 2001.
SHA-256, like other hash functions, takes any input and produces an output (often called a hash) of fixed length. The output of a hashing algorithm such as SHA-256 will always be the same length - regardless of the input size. Specifically, the output is, as the name suggests, 256 bits.
Moreover, all outputs appear completely random and offer no information about the input that created it.
The Bitcoin Network utilises the SHA-256 algorithm for mining and the creation of new addresses.
Who is Satoshi Nakamoto? What does Satoshi Nakamoto mean?
Out of respect for their anonymity, it would be rude to speculate in a video about who Satoshi Nakamoto is likely to be. The reality is, it's not important. Let me explain: Any human being can be attacked. Jesus could come back from the dead, and there would be haters. Therefore, the Satoshi Nakamoto approach neutralises the natural human herd behaviour, exacerbated by the media, to attack and discredit. This is a very important part of Bitcoin's success thus far. Also, from a security perspective, those who wish to dox Satoshi Nakamoto in a video are essentially putting his, or her, or their, life at risk...for the sake of views.
As a genius who has produced an innovation not just from a technical perspective but also a monetary perspective, they should be treated with more respect than that.
As for the name Satoshi Nakamoto, I would speculate that it is a homage to Tatsuaki Okamoto and Satoshi Obana - two cryptographers from Japan. There is another reason for the name, but that...is confidential.
In 1996, the NSA's Cryptology Division of their Office of Information Security Research and Technology published a paper titled: "How to make a mint: The cryptography of anonymous electronic cash", first publishing it in an MIT mailing list and later, in 1997, in the American University Law Review. One of the researchers they referenced was Tatsuaki Okamoto.

Part 2/4 - 'Crypto Market':
Most of the crypto market is a scam.
By the way, this was predicted very early on in the Bitcoin Talk forums - check out this interaction from November 8th, 2010:
"if bitcoin really takes off I can see lots of get-rich-quick imitators coming on the scene: gitcoin, nitcoin, witcoin, titcoin, shitcoin...
Of course the cheap imitators will disappear as quickly as those 1990s "internet currencies", but lots of people will get burned along the way."
To which Bitcoin OG Gavin Andresen replies:
"I agree - we're in the Wild West days of open-source currency. I expect people will get burned by scams, imitators, ponzi schemes and price bubbles."
"I don't think there's a whole lot that can be done about scammers, imitators and ponzi schemes besides warning people to be careful with their money (whether dollars, euros or bitcoins)."
Now, on the one hand, lack of regulation is more meritocratic (as you don't have to be an accredited investor just to get access).
On the other hand, it means that crypto is, as Gavin said, a Wild West environment, with many cowboys in the Desert. Be careful.
This is the same with most online courses - particularly 'How to get rich quick' courses - however with crypto you have an exponential increase in the supply of victims during the bull cycles so it is particularly prevalent during those times.
In addition to this, leverage trading exchanges, which are no different to casinos, prey on naive retail traders who:
A) Think they can outsmart professional traders with actual risk management skills; and
B) Think they can outsmart the exchanges themselves who have an informational advantage as well as an incentive to chase stop losses and liquidate positions.

Part 3/4 - CBDCs:
The Fed and Central Banks around the world have printed themselves into a corner.
Quantitative easing was the band-aid for the Great Financial Crisis in 2008, and more recent events have propelled the rate of money printing to absurd levels.
This means that all currencies are in a race to zero - and it becomes a game of who can print more fiat faster.
The powers that be know that this fiat frenzy is unsustainable, and that more and more people are becoming aware that it is a debt based system, based on nothing.
The monetary system devised by bankers, for bankers, in 1913 on Jekyll Island and supercharged in 1971 is fairly archaic and also does not allow for meritocratic value transfer - fiat printing itself increases inequality.
They, obviously, know this (as it is by design).
The issue (for them) is that more and more people are starting to become aware of this.
Moving to a modernised monetary system will allow those who have rigged the rules of the game for the last Century to get away scot-free.
It will also pave the way for a new wealthy, and more tech literate, elite to emerge - again predicted in the Bitcoin Talk forums.
Now...back to the powers that be.
Bitcoin provides a natural transition to Central Bank Digital Currencies (CBDCs) and what I would describe as Finance 2.0, but what are the benefits of CBDCs for the state?
More control, easier tax collection, more flexibility in monetary policy (i.e. negative interest rates) and generally a more efficient monetary system.
This leads us to the kicker: which is the war on cash. The cashless society was a fantasy just a few years ago, however now it doesn't seem so far fetched. No comment.

Part 4/4 - Bitcoin:
What about Bitcoin?
Well, Bitcoin has incredibly strong network effects; it is the most powerful computer network in the World.
But what about Bitcoin's reputation?
Bankers hate it.
Warren Buffett hates it.
Precisely, and the public hates bankers.
Sure, the investing public respects Buffett, but the general public perception of anyone worth $73 billion is not exactly at all time highs right now amid record wealth inequality.
In the grand scheme of things, the market cap of Bitcoin is currently around $179 billion.
For example, the market cap of Gold is around $9 trillion, which is 50x the Market Cap of Bitcoin.
Money has certain characteristics.
In my opinion, what makes Bitcoin unique is the fact that it has a finite total supply (21 million) and a predictable supply schedule via the halving events every 4 years, which cut in half the rate at which new Bitcoin is released into circulation.
Clearly, with these properties, it seems likely that Bitcoin could act as a meaningful hedge against inflation.
One of the key strengths of Bitcoin is the fact that the Network is decentralised...
Many people don't know that PayPal originally wanted to create a global currency similar to crypto.
Overall, a speculative thesis would be the following:
Satoshi Nakamoto is one of the most important entities of the 21st Century, and will accelerate the next transition of the human race.
Trusted third parties are security holes.
Bitcoin is the catalyst for Finance 2.0, whereby value transfer is conducted in a more meritocratic and decentralised fashion.
In 1964, Russian astrophysicist Nikolai Kardashev designed the Kardashev Scale.
At the time, he was looking for signs of extraterrestrial life within cosmic signals.
The Scale has three categories, which are based on the amount of usable energy a civilisation has at its disposal, and the degree of space colonisation.
Generally, a Type 1 Civilisation has achieved mastery of its home planet (10^16W);
A Type 2 Civilisation has mastery over its solar system (10^26W);
and a Type 3 Civilisation has mastery over its Galaxy (10^36W).
We humans are a Type 0 Civilisation on this Scale.
Nonetheless, our exponential technological growth in the few decades indicates that we are somewhere between Type 0 and Type 1.
In fact, according to Carl Sagan's interpolated Kardashev Scale and recent global energy consumption, we are about 0.73.
Physicist Freeman Dyson estimated that within 200 years or so, we should attain Type 1 status.
As a technology that, through its decentralisation, links entities globally and makes value transfer between humans more efficient, Bitcoin could prove a key piece of our progression as a civilisation.
What are your thoughts?
Is it true...or false?
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=1oQLOqpP1ZM
submitted by financeoptimum to conspiracy [link] [comments]

Nouriel Roubini: Bitcoin Is a ‘Ponzi Game’

Nouriel Roubini: Bitcoin Is a ‘Ponzi Game’ submitted by qznc_bot to hackernews [link] [comments]

Nouriel Roubini: Bitcoin Is a ‘Ponzi Game’

submitted by lingben to Economics [link] [comments]

NYU Economist and Professor Nouriel Roubini: Bitcoin a “Ponzi Game”

NYU Economist and Professor Nouriel Roubini: Bitcoin a “Ponzi Game” submitted by BTCNews to BTCNews [link] [comments]

Economist Nouriel Roubini Slams Bitcoin, Calls it a ‘Ponzi Game’

Economist Nouriel Roubini Slams Bitcoin, Calls it a ‘Ponzi Game’ submitted by BTCNews to BTCNews [link] [comments]

Open letter to Mister Porter Stansberry

First of all, Hello!
I hope all is well and you don't plan to die very soon like your good friend Rey Rivera.
But let's talk about Rey.
When I first started on Rey's Unsolved Mysteries case I did not think I would be solving ”who stole Johnny's bike” as some Reddit user (maybe one of yours) mocked me.
But neither did I exactly think I would be uncovering one of the biggest, most successful Ponzi variant pyramid schemes in the history of the world.
Now I was very surprised that the FBI ruled the ”ramblings” as paranoid, delusional and with evidence of a persecution complex. The document is quite congratulatory towards you Mister Stansberry, you had done a marvellous job until that point for your patrons, except for the few slaps on the hand you had received for overreaching a bit, the overall tone is very positive towards you, the very able tech savvy guy.
But let's talk about the note shall we. Why would a paranoid, delusional, suicidal man make a great little list of people on which he would put his wife by her maiden name instead as ”my wife” or ”Allison Rivera (wife)” similarly to the other family members.
And also put your own family, several people (who don't all work for you as the media claims) that are members of Bill Bonner's secret society club, The Oxford Club; And Chuck Batchelder (the owner of a local stock corporation) the future Bitcoin Belle and to investment advisors connected to the fund your secret club urges people to put their money into.
I know Rey had attended at least two Oxford Club events, but did he really know Addison Wiggin, Wayne Ellis and Bill Bonner so well as to put them on his little suicide list and wish some reward on them as on to the others? And why would your dead friend be found at Bill Bonner owned properties? And Steve Sjuggerud only joined with you at Stansberry Research after Rey left. So neither would he be close to Sjuggerud, a former higher up of Oxford Club.
Let me tell you what I think. I think this note is partial MoM of a meeting. Do you disagree? I'm sure you will have to. But indulge me a bit. Let's say it is. When could this meeting have taken place?
Well Thom Hickling ”gave his life for this pursuit” in December and so did Anne Rayburn,sister to George Rayburn (I am told by suicide as well,shocking). So it would have to have been after that.
Ray was at one of the Oxford Club events in March, The Investment U event, the one he was working at when he died.
Not only that, but this game that was ”so enjoyable” and ”had to end” in Rey's letter happens to coincide with a certain withdrawal of yours and Bill Bonner's from the executive committee and panels of the Oxford Club. Perhaps due to the attention you were receiving because of Ryals and the SEC? One has to protect home base isn't that so?
Let's talk about that for a moment before returning to Rey. Your mentor Bill Bonner speaks so kindly of you in a reply for mother jones, and adamantly sustains what you have already claimed that there is just no profit in being wrong that you don't trade in the stocks you advise on. But for 5k a secret private investor report I should think there is some profit to be made. He also boasts about some of the things you managed to warn about in advance.
So Mister Porter how can you both be bad and exceptional at your job? I'll tell you how. You're paid to do it. You Mister Porter are the MiddleMan. Well, one of them.
In one of the Oxford communiques it is eloquently explained how to do short selling and deal with penny stock. It also tells you while it is demonised it is not illegal. Well, not unless you accompany it with rumour mongering or pump and dump.
How would this work? I wonder as someone with no financial background. Well, I suppose it's actually as easy as giving conflicting advice and letting your secret friends at your secret club know when your ”advice drops” and when to act.
But what did your secret friends really want in the USEC case. Well. This was a long play game not a short term one. In your speech you so proudly say that all you did was interrupt a monopoly USEC had and if only the people who bought the stock held on to it they would be making money. So I guess you said it yourself, what the purpose was, people just didn't catch on.
Ah! but alas, The Oxford Club's member list is very very secret. What can be proven though is your place in it. And since we're on that. One of your big accentuated statements in conversations with Ryals was that you have barely had any contact with Jim Davidson (you called him Jim, same way as he is so fondly referred to at times in the communiques)
In fact, before that time he was very active in the Club. You of course started at the Club, before opening your own branch, The Oxford Club made you. I would assume being on various positions, Advisory Council, Exec committee, you would have no choice but do deal with James Dale Davidson. So why did you deny him so harshly?
I suspect the name Keith Richards in the letter could very well be substituted by James Davidson and the speech in Rey's letter would make sense.
PS Let us not forget naming Skousen, he was a frequent panelist and active member as well but Ryals did not have the Oxford Club connection, all he had was you being at events together.
While we are on the Ryals subject, both he and the note mention some patent debacle. He talks about a Stanford patent and a Mister Cooke. Who would that be, Boxley Cooke or Mr Cooke Senior, the father of his beautiful wife Julia Guth Cooke.
But let us get back to Rey. He is the reason we all are doing this. The three friends that found him. Steven King and George Rayburn specifically, not the rookie they dragged along to ”find” the body.
They were both rising stars of The Oxford Club. While George had remained affiliated with Stansberry for a while, he is now VP at Oxford Club, imagine that. But King did not work for you at all, he was an event manager of sorts for the club. Following year he was in the exec, well done Steven. All in all both rising stars of the club.
Now I am just going to be upfront, after publishing my research on a discussion board that was swiftly taken down, someone PMed me a confession. A confession to lead every enquiring mind to you Mister Porter.
Amongst the things this person said where that Thom Hickling was a whistleblower that was chirping to someone already connected to Agora. He alleges that 9/11 was the reason Thom wanted out in the first place, and that he tried to recruit Rey Rivera but he refused, explaining why Rey was being watched and the break-ins etc.
What I found interesting was that he said that it was you specifically who called Rey to meet up and forced him to take a sprinting jump off the building. And the Netflix episode points the finger at you as well.Heck, everyone out there is trolling your social media accusing you. But Mister Porter you, I'm told, had an alibi.
So what is the catch? Are you ready to give your life to this pursuit of wealth too, or do you believe you won't have to?
Because to me, all the evidence points to The Oxford Club and your secret secret friends.
George Rayburn was hanging around a gay bar whilst waiting for his buddy King to bring the third witness, witnesses say Rey had a fight with someone at a gay bar prior to his death.
This person that gave me the ”leaked information” alleges there was someone in the room while the body was on the floor, so access to the place was needed.
Rey's missing money clip, the fact that Cheetos leave the stomach way earlier than 5 hours as Mikita alleges she heard the bang at 10pm.
Web of lies. He was never on that roof. He died shortly after he got where he was going.
And I don't believe you gave the order.
Now I am going to tell you the trouble with secret societies, brotherhoods and secret friendships. There is a narrative surrounding it that makes you look insane when you dare speak the name. And that is exactly what happened to Rey. How convenient don't you think?
But one has to ask who really is delusional here, someone seeking an abstract power through wealth or someone believing that there are people out there that have succeeded in what we all want. To be top dog.
Freemasons claim that their pursuit is making men who are their friends better psychologically, at least this is how they explained it to me. But now, the way I see it, that can only be achieved by training empathy or psychopathy. Care to venture which one it is?
If Rey was seeking information at the lodges it was because he was looking at someone not because he was insane.
Of course the lodges would consider the club you were part of to be one of the organisations that they call clandestine.
Interestingly enough this little club you are part of even had a Rothschild on their wealth protection panel for years.
You often refer to your top secret investors as masters, and in one issue you attribute star names to your investors in your All Star Portfolio.
And then there is that line that just cannot be placed in the screenshot of the cut up note.
”I know the importance of our servants that is why I cherish them as secrets.”
This line exists, you can see it in the photo of the note still in the baggy it was placed in.
Couple that with all of the mason talk and the information someone gave me about how certain organisations separate minutes in a meeting by saying Junxit Mors Non Separabit, a question begins to peer its head.
Did Rey Rivera even write the note at all? And who cut it up?
The confession I received to make me stop said Rey wrote it that way so Agora would think it was nothing while specifically implicating you. But I believe the code cannot be completely cracked by anyone but the ones who agreed upon the code. You being one of them.
Allison Jones ”Rivera” came out and said that she knows what all of them mean separately she just doesn't understand why Rey would have it. I find that a very interesting thing to say. Couple that with everyone pointing the finger at you, one wonders if Rey wasn't doing it for you to have leverage.
So let us join you Mister Porter Stansberry, and your secret secret friends, on this endeavour to find the truth. But not for its own sake. In accepting this quest for the truth, we all hope to make ourselves, with your help, into people worthy and ready to receive it.
I think during this crysis other people could really use some of your truth to keep, especially the US who you predicted would fall. (the interests in China are going very well aren't they)
After all, what are masonic type organisations (recognised or not), but a very successful mafia that have elevated street smart to something that belongs in a castle.
A castle like the one Bill Bonner sits in, drinking wine that he caters to the Chairman's Circle and training the next generation of psychopaths.
Sincerely,
Just a regular person.
submitted by Idkoctavia to reyrivera [link] [comments]

The Truth about Bitcoin?

Part 1/4 - NSA Connection:
First off, the SHA-256 algorithm, which stands for Secure Hash Algorithm 256, is a member of the SHA-2 cryptographic hash functions designed by the NSA and first published in 2001.
SHA-256, like other hash functions, takes any input and produces an output (often called a hash) of fixed length. The output of a hashing algorithm such as SHA-256 will always be the same length - regardless of the input size. Specifically, the output is, as the name suggests, 256 bits.
Moreover, all outputs appear completely random and offer no information about the input that created it.
The Bitcoin Network utilises the SHA-256 algorithm for mining and the creation of new addresses.
Who is Satoshi Nakamoto? What does Satoshi Nakamoto mean?
Out of respect for their anonymity, it would be rude to speculate in a video about who Satoshi Nakamoto is likely to be. The reality is, it's not important. Let me explain: Any human being can be attacked. Jesus could come back from the dead, and there would be haters. Therefore, the Satoshi Nakamoto approach neutralises the natural human herd behaviour, exacerbated by the media, to attack and discredit. This is a very important part of Bitcoin's success thus far. Also, from a security perspective, those who wish to dox Satoshi Nakamoto in a video are essentially putting his, or her, or their, life at risk...for the sake of views.
As a genius who has produced an innovation not just from a technical perspective but also a monetary perspective, they should be treated with more respect than that.
As for the name Satoshi Nakamoto, I would speculate that it is a homage to Tatsuaki Okamoto and Satoshi Obana - two cryptographers from Japan. There is another reason for the name, but that...is confidential.
In 1996, the NSA's Cryptology Division of their Office of Information Security Research and Technology published a paper titled: "How to make a mint: The cryptography of anonymous electronic cash", first publishing it in an MIT mailing list and later, in 1997, in the American University Law Review. One of the researchers they referenced was Tatsuaki Okamoto.

Part 2/4 - 'Crypto Market':
Most of the crypto market is a scam.
By the way, this was predicted very early on in the Bitcoin Talk forums - check out this interaction from November 8th, 2010:
"if bitcoin really takes off I can see lots of get-rich-quick imitators coming on the scene: gitcoin, nitcoin, witcoin, titcoin, shitcoin...
Of course the cheap imitators will disappear as quickly as those 1990s "internet currencies", but lots of people will get burned along the way."
To which Bitcoin OG Gavin Andresen replies:
"I agree - we're in the Wild West days of open-source currency. I expect people will get burned by scams, imitators, ponzi schemes and price bubbles."
"I don't think there's a whole lot that can be done about scammers, imitators and ponzi schemes besides warning people to be careful with their money (whether dollars, euros or bitcoins)."
Now, on the one hand, lack of regulation is more meritocratic (as you don't have to be an accredited investor just to get access).
On the other hand, it means that crypto is, as Gavin said, a Wild West environment, with many cowboys in the Desert. Be careful.
This is the same with most online courses - particularly 'How to get rich quick' courses - however with crypto you have an exponential increase in the supply of victims during the bull cycles so it is particularly prevalent during those times.
In addition to this, leverage trading exchanges, which are no different to casinos, prey on naive retail traders who:
A) Think they can outsmart professional traders with actual risk management skills; and
B) Think they can outsmart the exchanges themselves who have an informational advantage as well as an incentive to chase stop losses and liquidate positions.

Part 3/4 - CBDCs:
The Fed and Central Banks around the world have printed themselves into a corner.
Quantitative easing was the band-aid for the Great Financial Crisis in 2008, and more recent events have propelled the rate of money printing to absurd levels.
This means that all currencies are in a race to zero - and it becomes a game of who can print more fiat faster.
The powers that be know that this fiat frenzy is unsustainable, and that more and more people are becoming aware that it is a debt based system, based on nothing.
The monetary system devised by bankers, for bankers, in 1913 on Jekyll Island and supercharged in 1971 is fairly archaic and also does not allow for meritocratic value transfer - fiat printing itself increases inequality.
They, obviously, know this (as it is by design).
The issue (for them) is that more and more people are starting to become aware of this.
Moving to a modernised monetary system will allow those who have rigged the rules of the game for the last Century to get away scot-free.
It will also pave the way for a new wealthy, and more tech literate, elite to emerge - again predicted in the Bitcoin Talk forums.
Now...back to the powers that be.
Bitcoin provides a natural transition to Central Bank Digital Currencies (CBDCs) and what I would describe as Finance 2.0, but what are the benefits of CBDCs for the state?
More control, easier tax collection, more flexibility in monetary policy (i.e. negative interest rates) and generally a more efficient monetary system.
This leads us to the kicker: which is the war on cash. The cashless society was a fantasy just a few years ago, however now it doesn't seem so far fetched. No comment.

Part 4/4 - Bitcoin:
What about Bitcoin?
Well, Bitcoin has incredibly strong network effects; it is the most powerful computer network in the World.
But what about Bitcoin's reputation?
Bankers hate it.
Warren Buffett hates it.
Precisely, and the public hates bankers.
Sure, the investing public respects Buffett, but the general public perception of anyone worth $73 billion is not exactly at all time highs right now amid record wealth inequality.
In the grand scheme of things, the market cap of Bitcoin is currently around $179 billion.
For example, the market cap of Gold is around $9 trillion, which is 50x the Market Cap of Bitcoin.
Money has certain characteristics.
In my opinion, what makes Bitcoin unique is the fact that it has a finite total supply (21 million) and a predictable supply schedule via the halving events every 4 years, which cut in half the rate at which new Bitcoin is released into circulation.
Clearly, with these properties, it seems likely that Bitcoin could act as a meaningful hedge against inflation.
One of the key strengths of Bitcoin is the fact that the Network is decentralised...
Many people don't know that PayPal originally wanted to create a global currency similar to crypto.
Overall, a speculative thesis would be the following:
Satoshi Nakamoto is one of the most important entities of the 21st Century, and will accelerate the next transition of the human race.
Trusted third parties are security holes.
Bitcoin is the catalyst for Finance 2.0, whereby value transfer is conducted in a more meritocratic and decentralised fashion.
In 1964, Russian astrophysicist Nikolai Kardashev designed the Kardashev Scale.
At the time, he was looking for signs of extraterrestrial life within cosmic signals.
The Scale has three categories, which are based on the amount of usable energy a civilisation has at its disposal, and the degree of space colonisation.
Generally, a Type 1 Civilisation has achieved mastery of its home planet (10^16W);
A Type 2 Civilisation has mastery over its solar system (10^26W);
and a Type 3 Civilisation has mastery over its Galaxy (10^36W).
We humans are a Type 0 Civilisation on this Scale.
Nonetheless, our exponential technological growth in the few decades indicates that we are somewhere between Type 0 and Type 1.
In fact, according to Carl Sagan's interpolated Kardashev Scale and recent global energy consumption, we are about 0.73.
Physicist Freeman Dyson estimated that within 200 years or so, we should attain Type 1 status.
As a technology that, through its decentralisation, links entities globally and makes value transfer between humans more efficient, Bitcoin could prove a key piece of our progression as a civilisation.
What are your thoughts?
Is it true...or false?
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=1oQLOqpP1ZM
submitted by financeoptimum to CryptoCurrency [link] [comments]

18 P106-100 & 1 P104-100 Mining Rig Build

18 P106-100 & 1 P104-100 Mining Rig Build

19 GPU Build with ASUS B250 Mining Expert - 470MH/s

Its my dream to achieve and build a mining rig of this extent.
Allow me to describe this journey of mine to the GPU mining community.
Kudos to all! Feel free to ask me questions and I would love to help you out.

2017 - Bull Market - Dipped my toes into the GPU mining market. Spent nearly 3k USD, 6x GTX 1060 3GB & 2x GTX 1070ti.

Back then, my setup was really simple, An ASUS B250 Mining Expert with Pentium G4400, 8GB of RAM, 2 PSU (Coolermaster 700w as well as a V1200W PSU)
Placed this entire setup on a DIY metal shelf
Bought extra 2 GTX 1060 3GB on my Ryzen 7 1700 setup back then. Mining Monero too on Cryptonight Algo. Really profitable on these 2 rigs combined. Earning approximately 35USD per day at the peak :)
Without much experience back then, my overclocking skills sucks. I was drawing a ton of power with very little efficiency. However, at that point I was literally making few hundreds every month. It has been a really wonderful journey until bear market hits.

2018 - Nicehash Hacked, Bitconnect & Bear Market Hits...

If you still remember the dreadful hack of Nicehash. One morning I woke up seeing that my rig was no longer mining. Saw my balance turned to zero. And the moment I saw this article, my heart sanked. With over 100 USD inside my account that point, I knew I wouldnt be able to pay for my electric that month. This pulled down my confidence but quite a little.
Still remember Bitconnect? Hahahaha well entered into this ponzi scheme too. Invested 100 USD into this, got it back and donated the money.
Disconnected my entire rig... It was a pretty sad moment :\")
My house became cooler, quieter and my power usage instantly went down.
Kept 1 GTX 1070ti & 1 GTX 1060 3GB and built myself a Ryzen 7 gaming computer hehe.

My disconnection from Crypto 2018-2019

I exited this market back at the very end of the bull run and never touched Bitcoin until 2019. I began to plan my future, created an investment portfolio where I finally included Bitcoin back into my high risk asset class. The resurgence of Bitcoin mining begans :)

2019 - Sold my Ryzen 7 1700 & MB for ASUS B250 Mining Expert with 19 GPU build in mind

It all started with my small mining rig of one ZOTAC GTX 1070ti as well as an ASUS B250 Mining Expert which I was using to mine Ethereum at 33MH/s, get paid 0.05eth approximately every 2 weeks on 2miners.com

Purchased 2 more GTX 1070ti, bringing my total hashrate to 130MH/s.
Revamped & Redesigned into a DIY rig. Didnt wanna spend the money to find a frame hehe decided to use my mums shoe rack instead HAHAHAH
Back then, 1 GTX 1070ti resale value was approximately 230 USD here in Singapore.
Calculated hash per dollar and I notice the insane price I was paying with my 1070tis.
Sold all 4 of my GTX 1070tis and manage to trade for the following cards:
  • x4 Gigayte RX 570 8GB cards @ 70USD
  • x1 Sapphire Nitro RX 570 8GB @ 85USD
  • x5 P106-100 6GB cards @ 63USD
4 Gigabyte RX 570, 1 Sapphire RX 570, 5 P106-100 6GB
With all the skills and experience I have accumulated in 2017, I began redesigning my entire 10 GPU setup. This was the end product of my 10 GPU mining rig consisting of 5 NVIDIA P106-100 6GB cards as wel as 5 AMD RX 570 8GB cards. Working fine alongside with one another as claimed by ASUS.
Hashrates:
  • NVIDIA P106-100 6GB: 24.8MH/s @ 85watts
  • AMD RX 570 8GB: 29MH/s @ 95watts

DEAL OF THE MONTH - ZOTAC P106-100 6GB @ 56 USD

The dream of building 19 cards were never off my brain. Been sourcing for cheaper 2nd hand cards and snap! 56 USD per card for ZOTAC P106-100. It was insanely a great deal. Sold my 5x RX 570 8GB, use the cash and baammm!
Got 8 ZOTAC P106-100 6GB (2 not in photo) for test. PERFECT CONDITION and I cant believe the speed I was getting in Ethereum. 450MH/S for 18x P106-100 6GB

2ND DEAL OF THE MONTH - P104-100 8GB @ 70 USD

Managed to achieve 35.9MH @ 124w. Bringing my total GPU to 19.

The screen all miners with B250s love to see :)
The entire setup of my 19 GPU rig. Fan is blowing at single direction, expelling all the hot air towards my door exit. Keeping my living room relatively cool.

Underclocked my rig to 466MH for better stability and power draw. Has been running fine for 2 weeks without any manual interventions.
Bought a HP 1200w PSU. Placed a 120mm fan on top of it to keep it cool. In case if you are asking how loud is it, actually its pretty quiet. I have only used 600w, half of the capacity. Hence, under full load I am not sure how loud it will be.

All in all, my journey of a 19 GPU build. Feel free to ask me any questions :)
submitted by amtf99 to gpumining [link] [comments]

The Truth about Bitcoin?

Part 1/4 - NSA Connection:
First off, the SHA-256 algorithm, which stands for Secure Hash Algorithm 256, is a member of the SHA-2 cryptographic hash functions designed by the NSA and first published in 2001.
SHA-256, like other hash functions, takes any input and produces an output (often called a hash) of fixed length. The output of a hashing algorithm such as SHA-256 will always be the same length - regardless of the input size. Specifically, the output is, as the name suggests, 256 bits.
Moreover, all outputs appear completely random and offer no information about the input that created it.
The Bitcoin Network utilises the SHA-256 algorithm for mining and the creation of new addresses.
Who is Satoshi Nakamoto? What does Satoshi Nakamoto mean?
Out of respect for their anonymity, it would be rude to speculate in a video about who Satoshi Nakamoto is likely to be. The reality is, it's not important. Let me explain: Any human being can be attacked. Jesus could come back from the dead, and there would be haters. Therefore, the Satoshi Nakamoto approach neutralises the natural human herd behaviour, exacerbated by the media, to attack and discredit. This is a very important part of Bitcoin's success thus far. Also, from a security perspective, those who wish to dox Satoshi Nakamoto in a video are essentially putting his, or her, or their, life at risk...for the sake of views.
As a genius who has produced an innovation not just from a technical perspective but also a monetary perspective, they should be treated with more respect than that.
As for the name Satoshi Nakamoto, I would speculate that it is a homage to Tatsuaki Okamoto and Satoshi Obana - two cryptographers from Japan. There is another reason for the name, but that...is confidential.
In 1996, the NSA's Cryptology Division of their Office of Information Security Research and Technology published a paper titled: "How to make a mint: The cryptography of anonymous electronic cash", first publishing it in an MIT mailing list and later, in 1997, in the American University Law Review. One of the researchers they referenced was Tatsuaki Okamoto.

Part 2/4 - 'Crypto Market':
Most of the crypto market is a scam.
By the way, this was predicted very early on in the Bitcoin Talk forums - check out this interaction from November 8th, 2010:
"if bitcoin really takes off I can see lots of get-rich-quick imitators coming on the scene: gitcoin, nitcoin, witcoin, titcoin, shitcoin...
Of course the cheap imitators will disappear as quickly as those 1990s "internet currencies", but lots of people will get burned along the way."
To which Bitcoin OG Gavin Andresen replies:
"I agree - we're in the Wild West days of open-source currency. I expect people will get burned by scams, imitators, ponzi schemes and price bubbles."
"I don't think there's a whole lot that can be done about scammers, imitators and ponzi schemes besides warning people to be careful with their money (whether dollars, euros or bitcoins)."
Now, on the one hand, lack of regulation is more meritocratic (as you don't have to be an accredited investor just to get access).
On the other hand, it means that crypto is, as Gavin said, a Wild West environment, with many cowboys in the Desert. Be careful.
This is the same with most online courses - particularly 'How to get rich quick' courses - however with crypto you have an exponential increase in the supply of victims during the bull cycles so it is particularly prevalent during those times.
In addition to this, leverage trading exchanges, which are no different to casinos, prey on naive retail traders who:
A) Think they can outsmart professional traders with actual risk management skills; and
B) Think they can outsmart the exchanges themselves who have an informational advantage as well as an incentive to chase stop losses and liquidate positions.

Part 3/4 - CBDCs:
The Fed and Central Banks around the world have printed themselves into a corner.
Quantitative easing was the band-aid for the Great Financial Crisis in 2008, and more recent events have propelled the rate of money printing to absurd levels.
This means that all currencies are in a race to zero - and it becomes a game of who can print more fiat faster.
The powers that be know that this fiat frenzy is unsustainable, and that more and more people are becoming aware that it is a debt based system, based on nothing.
The monetary system devised by bankers, for bankers, in 1913 on Jekyll Island and supercharged in 1971 is fairly archaic and also does not allow for meritocratic value transfer - fiat printing itself increases inequality.
They, obviously, know this (as it is by design).
The issue (for them) is that more and more people are starting to become aware of this.
Moving to a modernised monetary system will allow those who have rigged the rules of the game for the last Century to get away scot-free.
It will also pave the way for a new wealthy, and more tech literate, elite to emerge - again predicted in the Bitcoin Talk forums.
Now...back to the powers that be.
Bitcoin provides a natural transition to Central Bank Digital Currencies (CBDCs) and what I would describe as Finance 2.0, but what are the benefits of CBDCs for the state?
More control, easier tax collection, more flexibility in monetary policy (i.e. negative interest rates) and generally a more efficient monetary system.
This leads us to the kicker: which is the war on cash. The cashless society was a fantasy just a few years ago, however now it doesn't seem so far fetched. No comment.

Part 4/4 - Bitcoin:
What about Bitcoin?
Well, Bitcoin has incredibly strong network effects; it is the most powerful computer network in the World.
But what about Bitcoin's reputation?
Bankers hate it.
Warren Buffett hates it.
Precisely, and the public hates bankers.
Sure, the investing public respects Buffett, but the general public perception of anyone worth $73 billion is not exactly at all time highs right now amid record wealth inequality.
In the grand scheme of things, the market cap of Bitcoin is currently around $179 billion.
For example, the market cap of Gold is around $9 trillion, which is 50x the Market Cap of Bitcoin.
Money has certain characteristics.
In my opinion, what makes Bitcoin unique is the fact that it has a finite total supply (21 million) and a predictable supply schedule via the halving events every 4 years, which cut in half the rate at which new Bitcoin is released into circulation.
Clearly, with these properties, it seems likely that Bitcoin could act as a meaningful hedge against inflation.
One of the key strengths of Bitcoin is the fact that the Network is decentralised...
Many people don't know that PayPal originally wanted to create a global currency similar to crypto.
Overall, a speculative thesis would be the following:
Satoshi Nakamoto is one of the most important entities of the 21st Century, and will accelerate the next transition of the human race.
Trusted third parties are security holes.
Bitcoin is the catalyst for Finance 2.0, whereby value transfer is conducted in a more meritocratic and decentralised fashion.
In 1964, Russian astrophysicist Nikolai Kardashev designed the Kardashev Scale.
At the time, he was looking for signs of extraterrestrial life within cosmic signals.
The Scale has three categories, which are based on the amount of usable energy a civilisation has at its disposal, and the degree of space colonisation.
Generally, a Type 1 Civilisation has achieved mastery of its home planet (10^16W);
A Type 2 Civilisation has mastery over its solar system (10^26W);
and a Type 3 Civilisation has mastery over its Galaxy (10^36W).
We humans are a Type 0 Civilisation on this Scale.
Nonetheless, our exponential technological growth in the few decades indicates that we are somewhere between Type 0 and Type 1.
In fact, according to Carl Sagan's interpolated Kardashev Scale and recent global energy consumption, we are about 0.73.
Physicist Freeman Dyson estimated that within 200 years or so, we should attain Type 1 status.
As a technology that, through its decentralisation, links entities globally and makes value transfer between humans more efficient, Bitcoin could prove a key piece of our progression as a civilisation.
What are your thoughts?
Is it true...or false?
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=1oQLOqpP1ZM
submitted by financeoptimum to Money [link] [comments]

Clowerty.cc ! New Free Bitcoin Multi Coin Mining Site 2020  100 Gh/s Free Daily Mine 10$ Unlimited $hitcoins in Africa (CryptoKitties, Ponzi Games - Bitcoin Generator) Pyramid and Ponzi Schemes Explained  The Moloko PONZI GAME Ponzi Scheme Review with the Game Boy Geek

WOTOKEN Ponzi Scheme Garners More Than $1 Billion Worth of Crypto from Investors. Following Bitcoin’s sharp rise to highs of $14,000 in 2019, the PlusToken Ponzi scheme began offloading their illicitly obtained crypto on Huobi – placing a massive amount of selling pressure on the market. It is estimated that the scammers stole a total of 200,000 BTC from investors, which they then Reggie Fils-Aimé joins mobile publisher Rogue Games as an advisor. Putnam wasn't always a Bitcoin Ponzi specialist, he simply takes advantage of whatever is trendy at the time. For the moment The hottest new apps on ethereum resemble an old favorite: the Ponzi scheme. At least that’s the early consensus on FOMO 3D and PoWH3D, two of the platform’s top three apps entering Tuesday. The hottest new apps on ethereum resemble an old favorite: the Ponzi scheme. At least that’s the early consensus on FOMO 3D and PoWH3D, two of the platform’s top three apps entering Tuesday. According to data website DappRadar, both games have amassed 20,000 ether ($9 million) in trading volume over the last 24 hours, a figure […] Bitcoin Ponzi Schemes. These are hard to identify because often appear to be legitimate for set period of time before they pack up and are revealed to be scams. They tend to benefit the first few people who join them, who then invite their friends and later vanish with all the money. They are common because they make a lot of money within a

[index] [8413] [21687] [12710] [5528] [15224] [2935] [2710] [16846] [14415] [689]

Clowerty.cc ! New Free Bitcoin Multi Coin Mining Site 2020 100 Gh/s Free Daily Mine 10$ Unlimited

Célestin a acquis la maturité nécessaire pour se prendre en main financièrement. $hitcoins in Africa - Crypto Kitties, Ponzi Games - Bitcoin Generator. Three amazing songs in one original crypto song demo, no real mic, just a poorly lapto... Ponzi Scheme Board Game Review & How to Play Tabletop Gaming - Duration: 7:22. GLHF Board Games 448 views. 7:22. Catan Review with the Game Boy Geek (Settlers of Catan) - Duration: 13:39. Ponzi Scheme: Game Play Overview and Review - To Die For Games - Duration: 19:09. To Die For Games 537 views. 19:09. Ponzi Scheme Review - Duration: 12:38. Drive Thru Games 3,075 views. Paul, Ming and Hazel attempt some dodgy deals in Ponzi Scheme. Can you make enough money to keep your head above water while building your bogus industries? Skip the Rulebook to find out! 0:28 ...

Flag Counter